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mjsigrdrifa

Member Since 04 May 2008
Offline Last Active May 23 2008 02:23 PM
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Topics I've Started

Line Lengths Frustration

17 May 2008 - 12:27 PM

Okay, new to the sport and the forums, have only flown the Rev kites at the Kite Festival in Long Beach Washington, but I think I did okay for my first 45mins. I was just given a Rev for my birthday (way cool) and the lines we purchased for it are slightly different lengths. Frustrating 'cause the kite kept flipping to the right when I could get it up at all.

Slightly means by at least 2-3 inches, maybe even 4. The line is wrapped up on the holder right now, but the loops on the lines (forgive the lack of technical terms) all start within a 16th of an inch of each other and they wrapped up all the way to the other side. These were not manufactured and then shipped. A kite shop here in Oregon made them for me.

So my question is this: On a scale of 1 to 10, where 1 is screwing in a lightbulb and 10 is rewiring your house for electricity, how easy a fix is this? Am I headed back to the shop? (or another one, since why should I trust the guys who messed it up in the first place, however nice they may be...)

Conceptually I think I get it.
1. Lay out the line so that all four are evenly started
2. Check lengths (but after this it gets tricky right?)
3. Move the material that creates the "loop" that you create to attach to the handle
4. Retie the line to the right length
5. Cut off offending length beyond the new knot

The "loop" looks like a nylon "sock" that slips over the line itself and then is tied off to create the loop that you attach to the handle or bridle. If it's really just a sock that makes tying and untying easier and it can slip around when it's not knotted, that makes life much simpler.

I really wish that my Nikon hadn't died or I could send you photos of the extra length and what I mean by a "sock over the line" I don't know if "manufactured cord" would be different.

Anyhow, great sport, can't hardly wait to get it fixed and back out in the air (minus the unintentional twirling of course)

Matt