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Lines for Blast


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#1 Crawf

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Posted 04 November 2007 - 06:04 PM

Hi Guys/Gals

I wonder if you can provide me with any details on how strong i should be looking to make my flying lines for my blast?? :confused!:

cheers

#2 RevWizard

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Posted 04 November 2007 - 06:39 PM

Hi Guys/Gals

I wonder if you can provide me with any details on how strong i should be looking to make my flying lines for my blast?? :confused!:

cheers

High quality 150#(70Kg) spectra such as Shanti or Laser Pro should be sufficient. Shanti 150# is what I used. Stay away from any cheap spectra lines. They would most likely drive you nuts with the stretching as you would always be correcting the lines.

Long John (formerly Mr. R)

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13x 1st - 12x 2nd - 6x 3rd places in 37 overall Quadline individual competitions


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#3 Crawf

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Posted 04 November 2007 - 07:08 PM

Ok thanks for that!!

I have cheap ones for my Exp and like you said i spend more time adjusting them than flying with them :huh:

Also do you have any opinions of qpower line??

Any prefference on sleeving versus non sleeving??

thanks again

#4 RevWizard

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Posted 04 November 2007 - 09:55 PM

Ok thanks for that!!

I have cheap ones for my Exp and like you said i spend more time adjusting them than flying with them :huh:

Also do you have any opinions of qpower line??

Any prefference on sleeving versus non sleeving??

thanks again

I don't have any experience nor opinions on qpower line.
Definitely sleeve your lines.

Long John (formerly Mr. R)

STACK International Executive Committee - 6/1996-6/2008
International Rules Book Committee and STACK International Head Judge - 6/2004-6/2008
World Sport Kite Championship Judge - 2004-2005-2006(Chief Judge)
13x 1st - 12x 2nd - 6x 3rd places in 37 overall Quadline individual competitions


Web Site - http://www.johnnmitchell.com/index.html Check it out today!


#5 awindofchange

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Posted 05 November 2007 - 01:28 PM

Q-powerline is pretty neat stuff. We mostly use it for power kites. The entire spectra line is wrapped so you don't need to put any additional sleeving on it at all, just tie a knot in the end and go. There is quite a writeup on this line and to my knowledge, it is the only line on the market that has actually been wind tunnel tested. The special braiding on the exterior of the line is called a "Linear wrap" or something like that that is suppose to allow for a lower wind resistance by causing the line to vibrate at a higher frequency than normal line. This higher frequency of vibration causes less drag through the air. Basically the lower the vibrating frequency of the line the larger the sine wave the line creates as it moves through the air. The total resistance of the line is measured by the size of this sine wave or "vibrating frequency" is creates as it moves through the air. A lower frequency creates a wider band as it moves through the air causing higher wind resistance, this is true even though Q-power line is generally much thicker than normal spectra line weight per weight. This is also the reason that Q-power will start to "whine" a lot louder in strong winds under tension than other line. The frequency of the Q-power is higher which is why you hear it more than the lower frequencies of the other line. Q-power is a lot stiffer than normal spectra which is why I really don't care much for it for stunt kite flying. The heavier lines such as the 300# and 600# has been referred to as very "wire-like" and will actually have some memory in it (if you kink it then it will hold the kink). It pulls out just fine but it is very wire-like and stiff. The thinner stuff is not nearly as stiff as the thicker lines but still much more stiff than say Shanti or LPG. Slickness is not a problem at all but I think the Shanti can get more turns in it before it starts locking up.

Q-power is known for it's longevity. This stuff lasts for years without wearing out. On our power kites in our flying areas it is very normal to get 5 years+ use out of one set of q-power lines where normal spectra or dyneema will wear out in a year or so. I think that Q-power is also very underrated for it's strength. It seems to me that 100# Q-power can handle much more stress before breaking than 100# spectra (I have not actually tested this with a scale, just by pulling on it under high stress conditions). One nice thing about the Q-line and it's stiffness is that it hardly ever tangles.

To sum it up, Q-power is awesome line that is brute strong and lasts forever. I personally think this line will be nothing but headaches in slack line flying on stunt kites. A Rev may be a different story but I have not bothered trying it out on one yet. Q-power also costs a bit more than Shanti. For power kites I personally think it's the best line you can buy.

Hope that helps.

#6 Baloo

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Posted 05 November 2007 - 04:51 PM

As a quick sideline to this post Kent, with your mention of Sine wave etc.

When a line whistles or whines in the wind, is it any indication that it is becoming strained or nearing its breaking point. I have noticed much more singing in the lines in higher winds. I wondered if there was any indication from the noise as to suggesting going for stronger lines?????????

#7 FortFlyer

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Posted 05 November 2007 - 05:55 PM

4 - 150# lines is 600# of force unless your a 300 lb man you would get dragged before they break.
Jim,
Ft. Taber Park & Brenton Point

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#8 Crawf

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Posted 05 November 2007 - 06:01 PM

Thanks for the info guys I appreciate it.

And i think at about 200lb i'm much more likely to get my @$$ dragged than break a line!! Thanks for the heads up

#9 awindofchange

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Posted 06 November 2007 - 03:15 PM

Even though the 4 lines together equal 600 lbs it is still very possible to snap 150# line without being dragged, I have snapped 300# & 400# spectra line with power kites. Breaking strain can be measured in two different ways, one is to put a slow constant pull on the line up until the line breaks and then record how much pull was applied. Another is to hook a heavy weight to the line and then drop the weight straight down and see how much weight the line can hold before breaking. Usually lines can handle much more stress when the pressure is applied very slowly and constant. Kite flying can experience sudden gusts as well as quick sudden bursts of speed of the kite. If the two happen at the same time then it is very easy to exceed the pressure of your lines for a quick moment. This may not be long enough to drag you down the field but it will give you a very sharp jolt that might pop you forward a step or two. It could still put a lot more stress on your lines than the tested strength and cause your lines to snap.

In almost every case the line will break due to a snag or wear point on the line and not necessarily the wind. When the line gets stuck under a grass root, stick, branch of a tree etc... we just pull the line out thinking "no problem, it's 150# spectra, the line can handle it". The only problem is that the spectra line is made up of thousands of tiny strands of line woven together to make the 150# line. As the line passes over rocks, glass, tree branches etc... those small fragments of line get broken or warn which will cause a weak spot in the line and reduce the amount of stress the line can handle. As they wear more and more you will eventually get a line failure. In most cases it happens on a beautiful kite day with very moderate wind that should never have caused the lines to fail.

Line noise is caused anytime the line begins to move through the air. Lines do not move through the air without any obstruction, they are constantly flying through and around air pockets and thus, will vibrate or resonate while they fly. As the tension of the lines increase the resonating frequency goes up as the sine wave created by the vibrations gets smaller. The more tension the lines are put under the higher the vibrating sine wave. The lines are actually making noise when they have very little tension but the frequency is in the sub sonic region and is not audible. As the frequency rises the it becomes more noticeable. The noise does not necessarily mean that your lines are about to break, it just means that the lines are under tension. The higher the pitch the more tension the lines are under.

Hope that helps.

#10 Baloo

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Posted 06 November 2007 - 11:04 PM

Tanks Kent, EXELLENT reply as ever. Helps a lot.




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