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About the Pulling power of a Rev kite, and some background story


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#1 Percy

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 08:08 AM

Dear Guys and Girls,

 

Percy here, from the Netherlands.

 

In short.. I have a question about the power/pulling of a Rev Kite.

How is the pulling power of a Rev kite?

 

 

For those interested, hereby some background story of why i ask you this :).

 

My Indonesian grandfather loved to kite. As I can remember we always went kiting when I was small. It all started when I was around 5 years old. My grandmother always go with us, bringing food and drinks, and we as “real man” controlling the kite, trying to take it as far as possible into the blue sky (sometimes we lost sight of it, how exciting it was !!) It was mainly a 1 liner, with those typical Indonesian bird patterns.

 

I got older, and sadly my grandfather past away. But I continued my kiting hobby and bought several 2 liners, mostly cheap delta kites. It was great, and through those kites I got to learn to do tricks like flying low, landing, making circles etc. I all broke them.

 

I am born with a really bad form of scolioses (read: a mind boggling back), and during the night I use a breathing machine to stay alive. When I walk around in a kite shop and see all those beautiful kites I have to remind myself that, because of my “handicap”, I only weigh 32 kilogram, not much for a person of 29 years old. Doctors don’t know why, and I don’t care why. I feel great anyway! But when I ask for advice in a kite shop, I am always directed to the children corner to look for a kite when I explain my situation about Living the Life of 32 Kilograms. “The bigger ones will drag you around the world” the shop owner kindly explains. True, but I prefer to take a plane when traveling… I leave the store, losing my interest in kiting.

 

BUT… Two months ago my girlfriend and I watched the movie The Kite Runner. Great movie, but most of all it reminded me again of my childhood. After the movie was done, I quickly opened google to search for “fast kite less pull with quality”. I ended up buying a Prism 4D Ultralight and had never had so much fun with a kite before. It will always go up, is blazing fast with some little to no wind, and can take those famous “unintentional landings” quit well. More important, the pull is really gentle and the build quality is excellent compared to those “children corner kites”.

 

It made me curious what else is there in the world of Kiting? And then I found this video. I was like.. I… NEED… ONE… NOW… FAST…

 

So here I am. Youtube-ing like a maniac, looking at all of you controlling a Rev kite like a Zen Master who just reached pure enlightenment. I am totally impressed and really want to join this community. But one questions still stops me from buying and that is…

 

How is the pull?

 

My cousin has a NASA wing and like the shop owner once told me, it indeed dragged me around the world when I tried it. Great fun for other people seeing me kissing the sandy beach, but less fun for me. So how is a rev kite? Can I fly it without breaking bones?

 

I am looking for this answer trough this forum because I don't know anybody who has a rev kite. Heck, I don’t even know people who Kite (except my crazy cousin with his NASA landing equipment). Most of my friends are more excited about the playstation 4 or the new iPhone. You know what I am talking about… wink.png.

 

Thanks for reading this long post, I really appreciate it if you can give me some advice. Maybe there is a smaller version of a Rev Kite with less pull? I have to say, i really like speed though hehe. In the meantime I keep youtube-ing with a jaw dropping mouth of amazement. 

 

Percy

 

 

Btw, this is me scaring people on the beach with the 4D

https://www.facebook...418374894966740



#2 amexpmh

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 09:26 AM

There are a bunch of people here who know that. "Gotta have one" feeling. Cool thing about the Rev's is that you can tune out most of the pull. Also there are vented versions of the kite. The vents really reduce the pull. With a lighter frame you can fly a mid vent in very light wind. Then there is the B2 a smaller version. Very speedy but because of the smaller size it does not pull as much. Bert of luck to you.


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#3 Mike

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 10:39 AM

Percy,

you can fly a Rev. My daughter started flying when she was 8 years old and didn't weigh more than you. She now flies on Team 180GO!.

In light winds the Rev doesn't pull very much, and then you can switch to a vented model when the pull gets stronger. Or a Rev 2 as the post above mentions. But for control like you see in the video, I would stick with a Rev 1.5, which is the most common Rev that is flown.

 

There are some Rev fliers in the Netherlands, maybe one of them will chime in here and you can give it a try with one of their kites. It's also easier to learn with help, so I would try to find them. I'll actually be in the Netherlands for a week in April, but I'll be traveling light--without kites.

 

If you can't wait to try, buy a standard Rev 1.5 for light winds or a mid-vent for medium winds.

 

Please post back here and let us know how you are doing.


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#4 Percy

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 12:47 PM

Thanks guys for the super fast reply! Really appreciate it.

 

Its great news to hear that the pull can be taken out of a rev kite. Getting closer to hit the buy button hehe.

 

@Mike: 8 years and flying a rev kite. Wow. You must be an amazing proud father having a little girl at that moment? For me that also means good news, cause then the pull is not that crazy.

 

Now, as you both suggested, the Rev B2 or a Rev 1.5. I got a little confused cause i see several options. I understand the vented options but for now will choose a standard version. When the wind gets stronger I just get to the nearby cafe to have some coffee.

 

On Kiteworld.co.uk i see 2 versions that you advice to me. Those are:

 

1. Revolution 1.5

 

2. Revolution John Barresi Rev 1.5

 

What is the difference between those two? And which would you advice? Is the B2 just a smaller version of the Rev 1.5? I really like small/speedy kites though so a B2 sounds cool, but i am curious if that's the only differences.

 

 

Thanks again for the great help :)



#5 Mike

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 01:18 PM

The B2 is a smaller, faster kite with less pull. But it is not easy to fly with precision. It may not be the easiest kite to learn to fly on, but I know people who have started with a 2.

 

In the video you posted, it showed someone flying 1.5 with precision and teasing people on the Huntington Beach pier. 

I was there and doing that last weekend. It is a lot of fun, but it takes a *lot* of practice before you can fly that close to people without fear of hurting them.

 

Rev has a new 1.5 kite, called the New York Minute. The single vented version of that kite has a pretty wide wind range and would have the least pull. The vent is smaller than on the B-series kites.

 

Otherwise either of the two kites you linked above would work well.

 

Both the kites you linked to come with 2 wrap and 3 wrap frames--a 2 wrap spar is lighter and more flexible than a 3 wrap. Normally, you would fly with a 2 wrap in light winds, and then switch to a 3 wrap when the wind gets stronger. If you're concerned about the pull, when the time comes to switch to a 3-wrap, I would instead switch to a vented kite. 

 

Vented kites pull less, but are slower than a full (non-vented) sail. That's a trade-off for someone who likes speedy kites.

If the wind where you are tends to be gusty, a vented kite will smooth out the wind and you'll have fewer cases of a sudden pull on the kite. If you're lucky enough to fly near the ocean, your winds are probably smooth and that won't be a concern.

 

Once you start flying these kites, you will probably find yourself owning more than one anyway. So you're really asking, what should your *first* rev be smile.png

 

What is the usual wind speed where you want to fly your kite?

 

(and yes, I'm a very proud father :) )


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#6 swannie

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 04:05 PM

Percy,

Where in the Netherlands are you? I'm going to be spending some time in Germany (Papenburg, about 45 mins from Groningen) this summer and would be happy to show you a few things. I'm far from an expert, but I could at least get you started. :)

#7 Tmadz

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 04:07 PM

Percy, listen to Mike. He literally wrote the book on team and formation flying. If anyone knows pull on a Revolution kite it's him.



#8 Jim Foster

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 04:30 PM

Percy

 

Follow Mike's great advice.  We have flown with Mike for many years.  He knows what he is talking about.  Stick with the 1.5, you will never regret it.  The New York Minute full sail or single vent (depending on your wind conditions) should work for you.  A non vented and a two vent along with a race frame to use with the non vented sail in light winds should allow you to fly in just about any wind condition except very high winds.

With regard to your back, my wife has scolioses, perhaps not to the degree you do, but she flies Revs right along with the best, and for hours at a time.

 

Go for it..............and welcome to the Rev Forum


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#9 makatakam

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 06:14 PM

Welcome to the forum, and you will get to like them all eventually. Just like potato chips, you just can't have only one.


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#10 lylenc

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 07:51 AM

I can't tolerate too much pull. I only fly SUL and some UL dual line kites; the standard versions beat me to a pulp. For quad line, the B1.5 standard and vented and the B2 standard and vented cover all but the lightest wind range and keep the pull manageable. 

 

We go to Manzanita, OR every year, which is a popular kite boarding spot (high wind). I bought the vented B2, prior to that the vented Rev 2, for that beach. I can fly in 30 mph wind for several hours at a time. Before I got the vented 2s, I was grounded and frustrated most of the time.

 

As mentioned above, the vented versions smooth out the gusts and a beginner's flailing inputs. Also, the larger and slower 1.5 version is easier to learn on than the 2. I learned on a Rev 2, without anyone to show me the ropes, except for the inverted hover. At a festival, someone told me I was over-controlling (too big of inputs) and that solved the inverted hover problem.


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#11 Percy

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 08:45 AM

Wow great reply people, thank you so much for the great response.

 

So, i gonna follow Mike's (and everyone's else) advice

 

A mid/single vented Rev 1.5 Baressi must do the trick for now. I would like to have a kite that can fly in low winds and some more wind. It is not needed to fly in a storm for now so a rev 1.5 mid vented must do the trick?

 

@Mike:

Driving to the beach is like one hour, so only on some small occasions i will be there and can enjoy some stable wind. The wind where i live is gutsy. Strange because we have zero mountains in the Netherlands. So the best is to go for the mid/single vented, 1.5 Baressi I suppose? Something like this.

http://www.kiteworld...5_Mid_Vent.html

 

And what about this New York Minute. Looks really cool! Would you advice this one (have to import it from the States though)?

 

@Swannie:

I live in Utrecht. thats like a hour away from Groningen. Maybe cool to meet when you are in Germany in the summer. Great excuse for me to have a little trip to there.

 

@Jim Foster:

Wow, whats up with the woman's flying those Rev Kites. So cool! Great to hear she also enjoys it. I am really interested in the New York Minute. I hear the race frame is great, and i like the colors cat_wub.gif . You have some experience with this kite?

 

@Makatakam:

Ssssssssht, my girlfriend is sitting next to me wink.png

 

@lylenc:

So for less pull you also advice a Rev B1.5 to me? I like the idea of kiting the whole day so that sound like good advice. 



#12 Jim Foster

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 09:45 AM

Percy

 

Lynn and I each have a full sail, single vent and two vent New York Minutes.  We got them to use as team kites.  They fly very well.  For heavy wind we fly Extra Vent by Bazzer.  We love to fly vented Revs as they are so smooth.

 

As for women flying Revs, some of the best fliers are women.  I am blessed that Lynn has the same interests that I have.


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#13 Percy

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 02:14 PM

Which of the 3 New York Minutes do you use the most and would you recommend for me as a beginner?

 

And kiting together must be great fun! I started to get my brother interested also haha. Lets see.



#14 amexpmh

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 04:41 PM

Best would be the single vent. Better wind range with some venting 20% I think. It's hard to pick one because they all have time when I want to pull "that" one out. At KP I got to fly all four at different times. Flew all my B Series too. Spent the most time on the 1 vent NYM. It was a pleasure to fly.


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#15 Jim Foster

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 05:52 PM

Which of the 3 New York Minutes do you use the most and would you recommend for me as a beginner?

 

And kiting together must be great fun! I started to get my brother interested also haha. Lets see.

That's kind of like asking a golfer to select only one club.  It depends on the wind where you fly the most.  We flew for several years with non-vented kites, then we added a full vent (2 on each side), then an Extra Vent (4 on each side) then the mid-vent (one on each side).

 

Only you can make the decision, but I would start off with a non-vented kite with 3 wrap spars.  That will get you in the air most of the time.  I say that because that's what we did and it worked well for us.

 

Some prefer to fly alone, but flying together is great fun for us.  Flying with a group is more fun than one should have without buying a ticket.


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#16 Percy

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 05:01 AM

Thanks guys, for the reply.

 

I sended some questions to a dutch supplier to ask if they have the single vented New York Minute, and to kiteworld i send some questions about delivery of the rev 1.5b mid vented. If they dont have them i will go for the non vented 1.5b.

 

Does somebody know some good european dealers where i can check for availabilty? Maybe France, Germany...? 



#17 Tmadz

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 05:20 AM

Percy, do some research with your local weather service or websites. Check to find out what your prevalent wind conditions are. Since the wind is invisible, wind can be quite different in different landscapes and it is common for fliers to get the wind conditions wrong. The more research you can do now will help save you some money later on, unless you become addicted (as is often the case).



#18 Percy

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 05:38 AM

Quite a subject to research this kiting thingy. Cool! I will check some wind conditions indeed in my neighbourhood. Thanks for the tip.

 

Funny that every "hobby" has their own terms. Like, 2 wrap, vented, mid vented, checking wind etc. A bit overwhelming in the beginning though. Last year I started to build my own quadcopter/drone with first person view (succeeded) and I felt totally overwhelmed in the beginning, just like now. It just takes some time i think to get used to those terms. 

 

Something I am missing I need to know before buying?



#19 Captainbob

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 06:57 AM

Quite a subject to research this kiting thingy. Cool! I will check some wind conditions indeed in my neighbourhood. Thanks for the tip.

 

Funny that every "hobby" has their own terms. Like, 2 wrap, vented, mid vented, checking wind etc. A bit overwhelming in the beginning though. Last year I started to build my own quadcopter/drone with first person view (succeeded) and I felt totally overwhelmed in the beginning, just like now. It just takes some time i think to get used to those terms. 

 

Something I am missing I need to know before buying?

 

 

II have been flying Kites and Revs in particular, only a couple of months. Both this site and Kitelife.com have very active forums, and I have spent hours reading threads on these forums, since I got my first kite. The information is invaluable, in my opinion, and I learn something new every day.  Add to that, the tutorial videos on Kitelife.com , and the learning curve can be drastically shortened.  


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#20 REVflyer

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 07:51 AM

In the DC Metro area our wind gauge measurement is division!  

 

Take the quoted wind-speed from the weather channel and divide it by three.  Most measurements are taken 300 to 500 feet high, that doesn't help a sport kite flier though.  If the "service" says 5 to 10 mph for today, you're actually only looking at 1.5 - 3+ (SUL or Zen) down where it helps us.






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