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New Rev fliers experience


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#1 Captainbob

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 05:29 AM

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I just got into Kite flying about 2 months ago. Within a couple of weeks, after buying my first foil kite, I joined Kitelife.com and started hearing about the Revolution Kite. Having a background in flying RC helicopters and aircraft, the idea of a kite that was controllable like the Rev, seemed to be just the kind of challenge that I would enjoy. I purchased a 1.5 SLE as my first kite, and started watching all the tutorials by JB, over and over again. When I got the kite, I did the same thing with the DVD. The winds and weather did not cooperate at first, so it was a couple of weeks before I could even attempt to fly the Rev. The first day, that I had some good winds, I was able to launch the Rev, and fly for a couple of hours. I first started working on hovering at high altitude, and then gradually worked my way down. Several hard landings, no crashes, but a couple of dive stops on that first day, gave me alot of confidence that I could actually fly this kite with nobody to show me how except videos and reading. 

 

Within a couple of weeks, I decided I was hooked on Revs, and ordered a mid vent B series and a Race Rod frame, which I just got last week.  In the mean time, I flew the SLE some more and probably had 12 plus hours total flying time. Started working on forward flight, at lower and lower altitudes, slow flight, reverse flight, figure 8's, hovering in different positions of the kite, inverted launches, slides. and spins. The first time I tried a spin, I was really high up and had my fingers crossed, but it was much easier than I thought it would be. Now I am doing 3 spins in either direction in the middle of the wind window. 

 

I flew almost 4 hours yesterday on my new B midvent, and am finally realizing that I am starting to really feel in control of the kite. I don't have to think that much about inputs, it is starting to come naturally. I see the kite do something, and I know how to correct it. Not an expert, but don't feel like a crash or hard landing is around the corner anymore either. I even made some neat tip landings yesterday.  The point of this post is to show that with some organized study, a list of things to practice, some patience,and working on the basics, will have anyone flying one of these kites if they really want to. In the mean time, I learned about equalizing lines, tuning the leaders, modifying the handles with the no-snag mod. using stakes, winding quad lines, etc...... The forum on this site, and on Kitelife.com are invaluable in learning all there is to know about kites in general and the Rev kites. In addition, there is a chat room in the evening on Kitelife.com, when I can always ask a question, and get answers on the spot, from some very knowledgeable kite pilots. All this makes learning easy and fun. 

 

Can't wait to fly my Revs again.    


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#2 Dayhiker

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 02:09 AM

I've been watching your progress, listening, thinking & focusing more on my own flying efforts because of your journey. Thanks CaptainBob! You are encouraging me to go even further down the path.

May the forest be with you

"I live back in the woods, you see
A woman & the kids, & the dogs & me"

Bocephus


#3 beach

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 01:28 PM

Got ya, hahaha........ Ben ani_victory.gif ani_victory.gif ani_victory.gif 

 

WELCOME TO THE FAMILY



#4 makatakam

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 07:55 PM

hooked.............................


Mark

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"...it's a fair wind blowin' warm, out of the south over my shoulder, guess I'll set a course and go."
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#5 hyzakite

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 05:40 AM

Now that you are hooked on Revs there may be a time you will want to travel to the coast to fly, if I may suggest, you should take a beach chair or a 1.5 full vent with you. The way it usually works is, you get to the coast with a standard and midvent then the winds are too strong so you sit 99% of the time in your beach chair. OR! You get 1.5 full vent and get to fly 94% of the time no matter what the wind is while you are at the coast. As for the missing 6% that covers the extra vent you wish you had there also. ani_whistling.gif



#6 Captainbob

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 07:19 AM

Now that you are hooked on Revs there may be a time you will want to travel to the coast to fly, if I may suggest, you should take a beach chair or a 1.5 full vent with you. The way it usually works is, you get to the coast with a standard and midvent then the winds are too strong so you sit 99% of the time in your beach chair. OR! You get 1.5 full vent and get to fly 94% of the time no matter what the wind is while you are at the coast. As for the missing 6% that covers the extra vent you wish you had there also. ani_whistling.gif

 

You left at one more option which I have considered. I get a full vent, and can never get it off the ground where I normally fly, so it gets used maybe 1-2 times a year at the most. ;) 


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#7 stroke survivor

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 07:34 AM

Yep, but those few times mean you'll be watching or trying to fly the wrong sail in way too much wind! ani_giveup.gif


wayne from portland
You have 2 choices - live on or die!! I ain't the dying type!!!  Also known as "portland flyer" on some forums!

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#8 Captainbob

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 09:26 AM

 

You left at one more option which I have considered. I get a full vent, and can never get it off the ground where I normally fly, so it gets used maybe 1-2 times a year at the most. wink.png

 

I lived on the Ocean, in Hollywood Florida, for 10 years, about 300 feet from the water. The days when the wind was averaging over say 15 mph, were not very common, in fact, pretty rare, unless a storm was brewing. So my thinking is , if I spend a couple of days a year at the beach, the probability that I will be there on a day when  the wind would be  more than a mid-vent could handle, would be pretty slim. So to buy a kite, with the potential of maybe it being useful 1 day a year, at most, doesn't seem to practical to me.  If the wind is beyond 20 mph, I'll just get out my Symphony 1.8, and by the time I get to the limit of that kite, I don't think I will want to fly anything.....


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#9 amexpmh

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 08:36 PM

Bob that is fine thinking but you bought your first Rev a month or so ago. At this rate you will have 5-6 Revs by the time you go to the beach. Just make one of them a full vent. Then get an extra... It goes on and on.


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#10 REVflyer

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 03:27 AM

Ha! I never thought I'd have fifty+ of 'em either Bob!  

 

But every once in awhile I see one I've gotta' own.  I remember telling my wife in 2000 "if I can have a second set of these kites,  I'll never want or ask for another as long as I live"

 

I'm very particular too, no graphics with a pronounced/preferred viewing angle, (people, scenes), objects etc must appear visually appealing in any orientation, at speed or stationary.

 

I live inland like you, so most everything with lots of use is targeted towards my local conditions.  High wind revs are seldom used, yes I agree.  But borrowing a kite gets old too.  I like 'em tuned and even constructed in a very specific fashion.  I'm used to it...... "MY WAY".  I've been flying Revs since 1993, pretty hard-core since '96, first competed in '99 and built my first cooperative project as knock-offs that year as well for the Smithsonian with Harold Ames.  

 

I have used a different bridle since 1999 and magic sticks also for many years!  If you buy a kite a year and do it for a couple of decades, you'll have one for ANY set of weather conditions.  I have all the Revs ever made except for the biggest Speed Series 4-8 (too much power) and the xtra-vent (will never use enough to justify it's cost)

 

I've worn a few Revs out and sold a few, given some to my son (who lives in Atlanta by the way).  One kite bag gets to go most places, just like my wallet and cell phone.  Never buy a car without your bag along side you either!  I have kites for indoors up to when the porta-potties blow over.  You mark my words, you will be the same way if you stay in it long enough.

 

Most of us begin by covering the high wind (vented) and the low (SUL or full sail), then you fill-in between them, Mesh 20%, 40%, 75%, 100%, 135%, mid-vent, xtra vent, indoor, speed series, different size formats Rev1 or B2.

 

Maybe you meet some other local folks or travel/attend a workshop and try you hand at building a kite yourself?  My first one, I borrowed a sewing machine on site and picked parts out of my friends' kite material boxes laying nearby.  Tools are shared and coaches make sure everything comes out correctly.  Nothing is more rewarding than that first flight with a kite you built,.... except maybe when someone watching the flight asks you where you got it and tell them "men can sew, I made it myself!"

 

Again, you'll have a whole closet full of these Revolution kites even if you don't consider yourself a collector.  Or, you will drop-out for a new hobby.

 

The travel expenses to go fly with your friends and see the different locations available is the more costly aspect of being a rev family member.  (in my case it's easily 5 or even 10 to one)  All the peripheral expenses add up too.  Replacement flying line, rain-suits, boots, chairs, coolers, tarps, wicking layers, sunglasses, headphones, music devices, cameras, travel cases and luggage, roof racks, tie-downs, electronics.  Who cares, give something else up (I'm hooked!)

 

I sill come home with facial pain due to all the smiles shared during a flying session, even after 20 years!   I'm not sponsored and often quite outspoken, I pay full retail (usually more because of customization demanded).  Revs are still fun for me, dare I say it?,.... worth the money.



#11 Captainbob

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 03:36 AM

Ha! I never thought I'd have fifty+ of 'em either Bob!  

 

But every once in awhile I see one I've gotta' own.  I remember telling my wife in 2000 "if I can have a second set of these kites,  I'll never want or ask for another as long as I live"

 

I'm very particular too, no graphics with a pronounced/preferred viewing angle, (people, scenes), objects etc must appear visually appealing in any orientation, at speed or stationary.

 

I live inland like you, so most everything with lots of use is targeted towards my local conditions.  High wind revs are seldom used, yes I agree.  But borrowing a kite gets old too.  I like 'em tuned and even constructed in a very specific fashion.  I'm used to it...... "MY WAY".  I've been flying Revs since 1993, pretty hard-core since '96, first competed in '99 and built my first cooperative project as knock-offs that year as well for the Smithsonian with Harold Ames.  

 

I have used a different bridle since 1999 and magic sticks also for many years!  If you buy a kite a year and do it for a couple of decades, you'll have one for ANY set of weather conditions.  I have all the Revs ever made except for the biggest Speed Series 4-8 (too much power) and the xtra-vent (will never use enough to justify it's cost)

 

I've worn a few Revs out and sold a few, given some to my son (who lives in Atlanta by the way).  One kite bag gets to go most places, just like my wallet and cell phone.  Never buy a car without your bag along side you either!  I have kites for indoors up to when the porta-potties blow over.  You mark my words, you will be the same way if you stay in it long enough.

 

Most of us begin by covering the high wind (vented) and the low (SUL or full sail), then you fill-in between them, Mesh 20%, 40%, 75%, 100%, 135%, mid-vent, xtra vent, indoor, speed series, different size formats Rev1 or B2.

 

Maybe you meet some other local folks or travel/attend a workshop and try you hand at building a kite yourself?  My first one, I borrowed a sewing machine on site and picked parts out of my friends' kite material boxes laying nearby.  Tools are shared and coaches make sure everything comes out correctly.  Nothing is more rewarding than that first flight with a kite you built,.... except maybe when someone watching the flight asks you where you got it and tell them "men can sew, I made it myself!"

 

Again, you'll have a whole closet full of these Revolution kites even if you don't consider yourself a collector.  Or, you will drop-out for a new hobby.

 

The travel expenses to go fly with your friends and see the different locations available is the more costly aspect of being a rev family member.  (in my case it's easily 5 or even 10 to one)  All the peripheral expenses add up too.  Replacement flying line, rain-suits, boots, chairs, coolers, tarps, wicking layers, sunglasses, headphones, music devices, cameras, travel cases and luggage, roof racks, tie-downs, electronics.  Who cares, give something else up (I'm hooked!)

 

I sill come home with facial pain due to all the smiles shared during a flying session, even after 20 years!   I'm not sponsored and often quite outspoken, I pay full retail (usually more because of customization demanded).  Revs are still fun for me, dare I say it?,.... worth the money.

 

 

 

 

I just ordered a set of Magic Sticks yesterday. I am going to put them on my B series mid vent. Any tips on installing and or using them?  


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#12 REVflyer

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 03:55 AM

No tension/curvature should be in the frame during/after installation

 

 

after a few flight sessions these thin truss lines may lengthen, take one end off, add a single overhand knot into that loop part and snug next the existing knot

 

I want you to try to toss the kite (not affixed to the flying lines) both with the sticks installed and with the stand-off sticks removed, so you can immediately compare the glide.

 

Frame lighter than you think is appropriate, it's okay till the lines are whistling

 

Explore a wider wind window, the kite won't suddenly lose air and drop at the edges anymore

 

Try some tricks, it's okay they will get better

 

when done, roll the kite with the magic stick standoff tubes gathered next to the down spars at the leading edge, pull any loose lines inside first as well, I hold it closed with velcro so the sticks don't fall out mistakenly.

 

enjoy and let us know how it compares

-plm






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