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Lines for Rev SLE 1.5 for beginner


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#21 SparkieRob

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Posted 04 February 2014 - 05:47 PM

If you go for unsleeved, put a little pull tab onto the loop. This aids undoing the larks head.

Not too sure what a Stopper Knot is.

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#22 REVflyer

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Posted 04 February 2014 - 05:57 PM

Like a pull tab, but permanent, you build the stopper knot into the line at the halfway point, before the loop is closed, then you have an easy release.

#23 SparkieRob

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Posted 04 February 2014 - 08:59 PM

Like a pull tab, but permanent, you build the stopper knot into the line at the halfway point, before the loop is closed, then you have an easy release.


Got you. Thanks.

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#24 REVflyer

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 05:39 AM

Off topic?

I use forceps frequently with line making~ to lock and hold,~as a heat shield when melting ends and ~to measure

 

You measure 

by grasping the melted end of the roll's line ending point in the jaws and wrap AROUND length-wise from the tip to the locking mechanism, then back to the tip again.  If you have really shortie forceps, then do this a second time.

Pinch that new mark 'tween thumb & index finger.  That will become the center of your loop upon it's completion, so you have "measured" 50% of it's overall flat size.  Now move the forceps to this new point and pinch tightly on the single strand.  

Take the end point you just released and pass it over itself and back thru, around that tautly held strand TWICE.  Pull it tightly, so the knot slides/butts against the jaws of the forceps to your new measured point.  Separate the two strand and set the knot tightly.  

Add in double overhand knot next (which will slide or move easily on raw spectra) near the end point.  Separate the two strand halves, one into each hand and yank that knot into final position.  It can't "jump" those doubled laps at the half way point though, that's why they're there!  

Next you will move the forceps to the back-end of the "still to be formed" loop by sliding both strands along your finger's pinched grasp until you get near the end, when you will place a figure of eight knot to close off the loop. Place the forceps jaws at this final spot, insuring both strands are uniformly tight with the stopper knot exactly centered.  (you should have practiced slipping half of the figure of eight knot OVER itself and sliding all the resulting slack back-out away from the forceps FIRST before attempting lineset creation on your new roll of spectra).  

 

The beautiful part about building your flying lines in this manner is that all the measurements are perfectly uniform and the final knot (to close off the loop) can be located ANYWHERE along that length and they will still come out right!

 

I recommend you make larger than normal loops though, since you can only shorten them for equalization purposes.

The kite end of the lines should never have sleeving, so they separate individually much more easily during initial set-ups.  The handle end of the flying lines can have sleeving, but it should be the same material as your adjustment leaders (less opportunity to snag or tangle when throwing the kite around if everything is uniform)

 

Go buy your own, but get a comfortable finger hole size that fits you.  Forceps will make knot makings on a kite so much easier,..... go sleeve-less!



#25 oapbillf

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 06:17 AM

 

How do you use the lines "unsleeved"? doesn't that make them weaker at the knot. 

 

 

The answers already given fully cover your query and remember that if you are using short lines it would usually be in low wind conditions where the pull on the lines is reduced !

Assume that you are using 90lb LPG unsleeved, rate it at 50% for any knots and or damage and that still gives a breaking strain of 45lbs which is still one hell of a load on EACH line !  ani_victory.gif

 

I recently snagged a line, 120ft,90lb LPG, on a jacket zip and it was so badly frayed that I had to cut the damaged length a couple of feet from the end.

I then added a spare length of LPG joining the ends with a bloodknot, see image, and then match the other lines.

I fly using these lines on a vented Rev in 20mph winds, no problem ! ani_yahoo.gif

 

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#26 Dayhiker

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 02:04 PM

After reading & posting on this topic I got inspired to fly my 120's today. I first flew with a 1.5B mid-vent & three wrap spars. I certainly did enjoy the larger window of the longer lines. In my typical inland changing wind I did see some sagging of lines when the wind let up. But during the mid level & higher winds I felt well connected to the kite. The stronger gusts had me at the top of the window with the lines singing their sweet whine I love so much. Next I switched to my original full sail SLE taking out the black race frame & putting in the unloved SLE. I had not used the heavy leading edge in a long time especially since getting a race frame. I noticed the window got even larger than possible with the mid-vent. I could fly locked into the power easily. I was practicing flying lazy eights in preparation for using Revs for buggy power. I suppose my skills are better than when I first flew with the SLE & I did not really have any struggle with control. I also realized that the 1.5 will be enough kite to pull a buggy on higher wind days.

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A woman & the kids, & the dogs & me"

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#27 REVflyer

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 03:45 AM

I've personally witnessed buggying on a full vent 1.5 (that individual was no "giant" in stature though, HA!)  He eventually move to the outer banks, guessing the no-wind of the mid-atlantic states got too boring.

 

Unrelated:

One time Bob (Sundown) pulled a plastic kid's wading pool out of his pickup truck, then set-up an 8-pack stack of dualies and proceeded to lean back on the pool's edge whilst sitting inside it, (thereby raising the front significantly ~ Bob's a very big boy).

 

Oops, i forgot,... the night before we arrived for first Sunday fly it had snowed 8 inches of fresh powder.  We couldn't go to the Monuments (construction again!) so we went towards an equestrian park instead.  Hadn't plowed the lot so we pulled over on the side of the entrance road.

 

Anyway, we were all laughing at and kidding Sundown as he was lovingly cleaning out the pool's interior, then he set-up and went scootin' across the field howling in ecstasy.  Know what happened next?  WE double-quick formed a line to wait for our own turn scudding in the winter pool!

 

Oh yeah, 120s are a great flying length of lines regardless of your kite choice



#28 Reef Runner

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 03:40 PM

120's were the right choice for you, CB..............IMHO.   They will be much easier on you, during the learning process, but then, there's that long wind-up afterwards............again, good luck ani_victory.gif

 

Longer the lines.............the greater the reaction time you get, when something goes south ani_wallbash.gif


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#29 Captainbob

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 08:33 AM

After flying at the field next to my home for a few weeks now on the Revs, I decided that 120 ft would be not a good move for me. People in the park will sometimes walk across the field, or near the kite, and with the 80' I have, it is much easier to control, than it would be with an additional 40 feet on top of that. In addition there is a tree line to my right and left with the prevailing west-east winds, so lateral distance would be somewhat of an issue. I did want to get a spare set of some kind of lines, and with all the light wind days, I decided to order a set of 90# 50'. I will try flying the 50' in lighter winds, and if my flying skill is not up to the shorter lines yet, I will wait to fly them when the time is right.  Maybe some day in the future, when traveling to a festival, 120' will be the next option, but right now, I don't feel they would be useful in my situation. 

 

Here you can see the field with the trees to the right and left of the very long field.    SLE3.jpg


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#30 Reef Runner

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 09:02 AM

Yep, I see what you mean.  Got to be a tough spot to fly in.  No way the wind isn't swirling in there.  ani_wallbash.gif

 

Just for the heck of it, go out and cut yourself four or five small saplings, 6 - 8 foot long, and sharpen one end with a hatchet.  Then attach a 2 or 3 foot piece of surveyor's tape, to the other end, and go stick these in the ground.  Put one on your right, one on your left, one to the right of the kite wind-window, one to the left of the kite wind-window, and finally, one in the center of the wind-window, just out past where your kite travels.  Now, as you fly, take a look at the tell-tales on the sticks, an you'll probably be amazed at how many different directions, the wind is actually blowing...............(just something to do, one day when you are bored)  ani_victory.gif


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It's important to have as much fun as possible while we're here.
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#31 Captainbob

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 11:47 AM

Yep, I see what you mean.  Got to be a tough spot to fly in.  No way the wind isn't swirling in there.  ani_wallbash.gif

 

Just for the heck of it, go out and cut yourself four or five small saplings, 6 - 8 foot long, and sharpen one end with a hatchet.  Then attach a 2 or 3 foot piece of surveyor's tape, to the other end, and go stick these in the ground.  Put one one your right, one on your left, one to the right of the kite wind-window, one to the left of the kite wind-window, and finally, one in the center of the wind-window, just out past where your kite travels.  Now, as you fly, take a look at the tell-tales on the sticks, an you'll probably be amazed at how many different directions, the wind is actually blowing...............(just something to do, one day when you are bored)  ani_victory.gif

 

After reading your post, I decided to check out a site that was mentioned in the AKA listing of flying fields on their website. It is the Georgia Perimeter College in Decatur Georgia.  I was already in Decatur this afternoon, so I drove over there, pulled up to the field and see a middle aged guy packing up this huge SLK. He had a roll of about 1,000 feet of 300 pound test line. I walked over to him and started asking about flying at this field. First of all, this has to be the Holy Grail of kite flying fields in the Atlanta area. The main part of the field is adjacent to the College Admin building, and there is not a tree in site. It is manicured short grass, and completely level. He is a lawyer, and  told me that he always flies his kites there , and reels out the entire 1,000 feet of line, and still doesn't reach the main  road that borders the field on the East side. He has been flying there for 12 years, both during the week and on the weekend. Plenty of parking right next to the field. He  has no problems from the college people, spectators, or the security folks that are there. He says the winds are smooth because of the openness of the field, and lack of trees and buildings that are in the winds' path.  The only down side is that it is a 17 mile trip to this field from my home, but it is on I-285, so takes only about 20 minutes. Well worth it, and the time I waste fighting the winds at my local field, will be saved by this 20 minute drive.  Can't wait to fly there next week .  ani_victory.gif ani_victory.gif   


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#32 Reef Runner

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 12:26 PM

Fantastic !   I sure wish I could find a place like that, somewhere close by ani_wallbash.gif

 

Still ought to set out some tell-tales, on your home field, just to see what is happening.  I don't know, but maybe you could even leave them up for about a week, so you could check it out, under different conditions......you'll probably be surprised, at just how squirrelly, it really is.....


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It's important to have as much fun as possible while we're here.
It balances out the times, when the minefield of life explodes.

J Buffett - "A Pirate Looks at Fifty"


#33 Captainbob

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 01:30 PM

Fantastic !   I sure wish I could find a place like that, somewhere close by ani_wallbash.gif

 

Still ought to set out some tell-tales, on your home field, just to see what is happening.  I don't know, but maybe you could even leave them up for about a week, so you could check it out, under different conditions......you'll probably be surprised, at just how squirrelly, it really is.....

 

Yes I think I will do that. Probably will indicate 'wind shear" much of the time.  ;)


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