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#1 SkyPuppet

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 02:14 PM

Welcome everyone to 2014!

January 2nd, I noticed that I had finally worn holes through the wear strips, and through to the sail of my STD sail Forest Fade B-Pro. While this kite is still fully flyable, I am going to replace it soon (I have decided to use it as my "festival" kite henceforth).

I have kept logs on flight time and maintenance on all my 'Pros. Here's some relevant data regarding maintenance on the STD:
Flight time: 553 hours
Bungee adjustment/tightening: 50, 174, 307, 404 hours
Bridle center loop replaced: 307 hours
Leading Edge mesh holes discovered: 368 hours
Bridle replaced: 404 hours

On a quick, separate note, I've been replacing my handle's adjustable leaders around 400 hours.

Keep in mind that I generally fly horrendously underpowered, and I'm constantly abusing my Rev on all the juicy tricks- axels, flic-flacs, 3D, etc.
Also and again, this sail is still air-worthy, for awhile anyways... At 553 hours, there are 4 inch+ long tears in the LE mesh (and 2 smaller tears), the wear strip has holes in a few places on each side, and the holes in the sail are bound to keep spreading, unless I fix it soon. In all actuality it will be the LE tears that finally 'ground it, and while the mesh is replaceable/fixable, the wear strips seem like too much effort to fix... need to check into it...

I really thought the LE material would be just hammered by now, but it is holding up beautifully. Haven't had to burn not one loose thread ever! I also figured all the bungee holes would be looking stretched out and ragged, but I'm happy to say that they aren't stretched out much at all. The bungee material itself is also holding up well. All my endcaps look used, but with no cracks, they haven't needed replacing.

The overall point for keeping the log is to check my return on investment. I'm happy to say that, so far, it's costing me about $.60 per hour to utterly enjoy myself with this kite!! That's 60 cents per hour! And it's still flying :D

To Bazzer, my friends at Revolution, and all the employees there- Thanks for building such an outstanding, quality-minded product!

Have Rev, Will Travel

 

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#2 genesant

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 05:25 PM

My son and son-in-law kid me about how much stuff I document.  Wait till they hear about you.  My hat is off to you!  I consider that to be very useful info.



#3 SparkieRob

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 08:47 PM

That's the kind of OCD behaviour that I LOVE! Keep it up. Now all I have to do is convert to $AUS and reverse engineer to an wage hourly rate and I'm all set....

"Inbetween heaven and earth, there are kites."


#4 SkyPuppet

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Posted 06 January 2014 - 08:37 AM

Thanks guys, hope it helps... I used to do analysis of big truck maintenance, got me in the habit of keeping journals on expensive consumables. I'm glad to say $.60 per hour to operate takes the Rev out of the "expensive" consumables class ;)

I'm going to finish collecting data across all my B-Pros, and once I wear out my last (original) 'Pro, I'll post the results here, and forget about this journal for good lol.

Have Rev, Will Travel

 

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#5 REVflyer

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 09:09 AM

conservative estimate?, seven months of using my new Zen has cost me $1.80 per hour (ten hours per week, four weeks per month assumed, = 300 hrs)  Barbara paid a big premium for a highly customized build version w/special Diamond frame

 

The previous Zen lasted about 2-1/2 years or around 1,310 hours of extreme abuse,... using that same calculation,

that equates under $0.34/hr

 

I gott'a say, Revs are a great financial value for entertainment in my opinion.  You can fly 'em until they are a ragged mess of holes, scuffs and tears, they take a beating better than MMA practitioners!   Eventually you'll want a replacement though, then freak-out about how nice it flies with a crispy new sail.



#6 REVflyer

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 09:15 AM

My numbers don't look so good if you include all the replacement flying line and bridles that have been worn thru!

 

Do you factor in the travel expenses to go fly with your buds?   OUCH, a couple of decades of that fun adds-up pretty quick!

 

I guess if I was "flat-broke" I'd still walk out the homestead's front door and fly in my neighborhood park, even alone.



#7 Dayhiker

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 04:26 PM

So as my experience grows I can change from "Fly em till they break." to "Fly em till they're rags." Rock on.

May the forest be with you

"I live back in the woods, you see
A woman & the kids, & the dogs & me"

Bocephus


#8 SkyPuppet

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 08:18 PM

My numbers don't look so good if you include all the replacement flying line and bridles that have been worn thru!
 
Do you factor in the travel expenses to go fly with your buds?   OUCH, a couple of decades of that fun adds-up pretty quick!
 
I guess if I was "flat-broke" I'd still walk out the homestead's front door and fly in my neighborhood park, even alone.


I did factor in bridle replacement costs, but not travel... I live in a big master-planned community that has 3 parks within walking distance, so I generally do walk. I'd like to say I spend lots of time flying with friends, but I'd say 97% of my flight time is solo :/

Have Rev, Will Travel

 

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#9 REVflyer

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 03:55 AM

Myself?,.... probably 60% flying alone, but those trips to "hang with the gang" are truly worth the money (or sacrifices if you prefer).  

 

Next week a big pack of us descend upon Treasure Island (nearby Tampa FL) for a long weekend of flying.  It will be two tons of fun, even the misses will enjoy herself (and she's not even a sport kite fan, prefers the art & show kites, particularly the home-builder crowd).

 

Sport kite competition events are mixed in with the demos (on the same field!) because that's the way the city wants it to be run (we are entertainment).  There will be a LARGE group of quads flying from sunrise until late into the night, together with all those "unique" personalities sharing the convenience of walk-out perfection from the Thunderbird.

 

Dantonio, Shooks & the Smith, Alden Miller, Dugard, Comras, folks from the mid-west and great lakes region,.... a huge assembly all seeking the same thing.  A return on their investment in travel expenses thru intense fun!

 

Sharing the sky is WAY more fun than flying alone. Even if I'm alone flying though, I still want spectators to interact with or it's too boring.  I don't understand "flying with intent" but I surely do get the pleasure of chasing my friends when they aren't expecting it or giving kids a lesson with Revolution kites!



#10 Tmadz

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 05:17 AM

Being a financial analyst you could include much more in the fully absorbed cost of ownership. For manufacturing machinery the cost varies but you could conceivably spend seven times your initial capital on use, maintenance and repair over its life. For the rev I would possibly include a labor rate for your time spent fixing it, but don't forget any residual value. As we know someone is always willing to buy your old rev, unless it truly is rags. My company would buy used equipment and then rebuild it for use. Our costs were already being spent somehow, except for the parts. Overall I prefer not to track most costs for my hobbies, with the exception of really expensive tools or materials. Value comes down to what you are willing to pay for it. For someone else it might be a much higher threshold (anybody know a boat owner?) than yourself. For me the side benefits are so much higher than can be measured. I.e. Fresh air, sunshine or rain, comaraderie, joy, stress relief, no electricity, etc.

#11 SkyPuppet

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 03:37 PM

Being a financial analyst you could include much more in the fully absorbed cost of ownership. For manufacturing machinery the cost varies but you could conceivably spend seven times your initial capital on use, maintenance and repair over its life. For the rev I would possibly include a labor rate for your time spent fixing it, but don't forget any residual value. As we know someone is always willing to buy your old rev, unless it truly is rags. My company would buy used equipment and then rebuild it for use. Our costs were already being spent somehow, except for the parts.Overall I prefer not to track most costs for my hobbies, with the exception of really expensive tools or materials. Value comes down to what you are willing to pay for it. For someone else it might be a much higher threshold (anybody know a boat owner?) than yourself. For me the side benefits are so much higher than can be measured. I.e. Fresh air, sunshine or rain, comaraderie, joy, stress relief, no electricity, etc.


Tmadz,
Yes, of course I could go on and on and on about the variables of what it costs to operate a Rev, but this topic was not started to specifically discuss money, and my opening post was long-winded enough, and this was a hobby analysis... While my own personal analysis included more data than I represented, I feel I've shown the important maintenance factors involved. I left out (most) anything that wasn't intrinsic to the operation of the Rev. Also, I didn't factor for labor, because if I'm going to pay myself to fix it then I should pay myself to fly it as well! So far as residual value goes, my std Pro is in need of serious help. I don't think anyone in the know would pay for it in the shape its in. I think I will always fly them till they die.

It sounds as if maybe you are well-to-do financially, but I watch my costs across the board, and its reassuring to know that my hobby isn't sucking my bank account dry, like the remote control hobby I had was. And yes, that statement is directly tied to value. However, while value is a perception that drives cost thresholds, value itself is not directly tied to money.. I dropped in the part about money in the hopes of helping someone understand that to just see it as a $350+ kite is not looking at a big enough picture, if you see the value in flying Revs at all.

Have Rev, Will Travel

 

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#12 Tmadz

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 05:33 PM

It sounds as if maybe you are well-to-do financially, but I watch my costs across the board, and its reassuring to know that my hobby isn't sucking my bank account dry, like the remote control hobby I had was. And yes, that statement is directly tied to value. However, while value is a perception that drives cost thresholds, value itself is not directly tied to money.. I dropped in the part about money in the hopes of helping someone understand that to just see it as a $350+ kite is not looking at a big enough picture, if you see the value in flying Revs at all.

 

I agree wholeheartedly. Well off? maybe not so much, but I couldn't help getting so detailed since it's what I do. (and I've learned to be discriminating with my money) I love it because I don't need to buy electronics, fuel, batteries or software. Once you have the kite ,lines, handles and wind, you're off to the races as much as you want. That's the best return for my money. My father taught me to buy quality, take care of it and you'll have it for a long time. That's why I'm so particular with my kite storage and maintenance. I'm glad to see most others are as well. That's why I've bought some extremely nice used kites.






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