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First rev for inland winds?


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#1 katrina

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Posted 26 March 2012 - 09:00 PM

This is for a dualie flier looking to buy a first rev, not on the forum yet. I've given him an earful on all the options, but I'm not sure about standard vs. vented, given the conditions. Light winds would seem to indicate a standard to start, but choppy variable inland wind makes me think mid, or maybe even full vent with light rods. For those of you who fly in crappy wind, what do you think?

"The winds around here (Salt Lake City vicinity) pretty much suck. Spring is the windy season here. I flew yesterday for a few hours and the winds were calm to 15 and 20 mph during that time- all over the place. Much of the year we have these desert to mountain kind of winds here- variable, unpredictable, inconsistant and typically on the light side. I have a bag full on dualies now and notice that I'm tending to buy more ULs and even SULs- again that says something about our winds. I'm told that learning to trick a dualie is harder using light kites, but if I didn't use them I would not get near the air time that I'm getting now."


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#2 awindofchange

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Posted 26 March 2012 - 09:08 PM

I would go for the standard sail. SLC typically has light winds most of the year, a vented or even mid-vent kite will not get nearly as much air time as a standard will. If your collection mainly consists of ul's and SUL;s, then don't bother with a vented Rev.

#3 REVflyer

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 03:09 AM

standard sail and race frame,
if you need to push even further into no-wind you can swap out the down-spars, for a tapered 2-P from SS or their Black Diamond 3-PT (*more durable & more weight*) but they both will need to be cut down to fit (dremmel cutting wheel, electrical tape wrapped over the cut first, so the stick doesn't splinter)

You might like a longer throw length on the handles in low wind too, lots of folks fly on no-snag 15s to great effect.

Try various line lengths. Longer gets you more time to react, but also more drag and potentially slack to be overcome. Shorter lengths make things happen instantly and right in front of you, they're easier to fly in bad or no wind but things can go wrong mighty quick too!

go to places with some other Rev pilots and share equipment, knowledge, maybe even their lunch!

#4 stroke survivor

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 08:52 AM

My 2 cents - std "B" or SUL SLE, 2 wrap or race frame, 15" handles, and 50'x50# lineset!! My light wind "go-to" setup!! If it won't fly, get out a glider!! Posted Image

wayne from portland
You have 2 choices - live on or die!! I ain't the dying type!!!  Also known as "portland flyer" on some forums!

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#5 Love2fly

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 09:57 PM

I would go for the standard sail. SLC typically has light winds most of the year, a vented or even mid-vent kite will not get nearly as much air time as a standard will. If your collection mainly consists of ul's and SUL;s, then don't bother with a vented Rev.



standard sail and race frame,
if you need to push even further into no-wind you can swap out the down-spars, for a tapered 2-P from SS or their Black Diamond 3-PT (*more durable & more weight*) but they both will need to be cut down to fit (dremmel cutting wheel, electrical tape wrapped over the cut first, so the stick doesn't splinter)

You might like a longer throw length on the handles in low wind too, lots of folks fly on no-snag 15s to great effect.

Try various line lengths. Longer gets you more time to react, but also more drag and potentially slack to be overcome. Shorter lengths make things happen instantly and right in front of you, they're easier to fly in bad or no wind but things can go wrong mighty quick too!

go to places with some other Rev pilots and share equipment, knowledge, maybe even their lunch!



What they said!


Hi Katrina...

How's everything?




Laura
 
*** Any day flying is a good day; have a great one! 
**** REVS: Fly it, you'll like it!
***** L.S.P. ... It's worth the trip!
 
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#6 Aerochic

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 05:05 AM

I fly in mostly crappy inland winds, so for starters I would recommend...

1) standard sail and race frame (as per Revflyer)
2) midvent and race frame


Those are the two Revs I use most often. Down the line and once established, I would then recommend a Zen.

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#7 Jeff

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 06:55 AM

Standard sail and comfortable running shoes.
CYuLf.jpg 0LPEo.png and ybuXm.png




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