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Are your four lines the same length?


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#41 David M

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Posted 20 July 2010 - 11:03 PM

I understand now.
I think a basic reason for this is that when making pigtails for handles, the top pigtails are always longer than the bottom to lay the leading edge back a bit. Basically, instead of extending the top lines via pigtails, the top lines themselves are made longer.

And, as John mentions, if you had longer top lines and pigtails, you could adjust the handle setup to compensate for the difference in length. The smaller the difference between the tops and bottoms, the less you have to compensate. So, if the difference is 12 inches, it may be difficult to compensate for it, whereas a difference of 2-3 inches is easily compensated for by pulling in or letting out the lines by a few knots. As long as the tops are the same and the bottoms are the same, there will not be any issues with, say, the kite turning on its own.


All clear now Watty thanks so muchPosted Image
David M.....Just a (slightly ) over aged guy playing with kites......and LOVIN' it

#42 David M

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Posted 20 July 2010 - 11:06 PM

To be quite clear, again referring only to the popular methodology... Always, the top lines need to be extended by way of leaders.

SLE, EXP, B, doesn't matter... Gotta lay the leading edge back to maximize control.

Top lines can be longer by 2"-3", no problem, because the adjustments on the top allow you to use or compensate for that.



Thats spot on with mine thanks JBPosted Image
David M.....Just a (slightly ) over aged guy playing with kites......and LOVIN' it

#43 Kitelife

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Posted 20 July 2010 - 11:47 PM

Thats spot on with mine thanks JBPosted Image


The 2"-3" differential in top/bottom lines, and 6"-9" leaders on the top of your handles?

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#44 PeterN

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 02:06 PM

I tried a mates line equaliser to set my lines up a few months back, and found a big difference in all my lines, the kites feel more balanced to me.

So I used a plastic chopping board and made my own. It works well and I find it much easier to keep my line balanced.

#45 David M

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 02:08 PM

The 2"-3" differential in top/bottom lines, and 6"-9" leaders on the top of your handles?



So far I haven't put any leaders on,when I do,do I put them on both or just the topPosted Image
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#46 Kitelife

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 03:05 PM

Just the top, bottoms only need to be 2"-3" long for the attachment, no adjusting there.

Once you have the top leaders on, let the adjustments all the way out until you can't launch, then pull 'em back in 1 knot at a time until you can launch.

As you get more skilled, that "working" knot should get further out.

On iQuad, we fly with a full 8"-9" extension on top, PLUS the 2"-3" differential in the top lines (from stretching).

Again, that comes from knowing the kite and techniques really well.

John Barresi

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#47 --Pete

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Posted 25 October 2010 - 06:57 AM

The best system I've found for getting lines the same length is to measure them under tension - quite a bit of tension. The trick is getting the same tension on all four lines at once.

My method is to make up two boards with four pegs/nails in a row on each. Set these up facing each other by clamping them to a fence post, table, or sawhorse heavy enough that a couple of hundred pounds pull can't tip it over.

Make up the first line to the length you want and loop the ends over the first pair of pegs. Move one pegboard until you have 20 or 30 pounds of tension on the line. Even as tight as this, there will be a small amount of sag in the line.

Now begin making the other lines. Keep adjusting the length until the sag is identical between lines. This is VERY easy to check by eye, and will assure that the tension is exactly the same in each line, and is much more accurate than you can read on a typical tension gauge (which you would need four of to check lines simultaneously).

If you are making a line set for flying in very light (or no) wind, you might consider making the lines under lower tension - say 10 pounds. The sag will be larger, but still easy to match up by eye. This has never been an issue for me as I have only my old original Rev I, which is too heavy to fly in light winds (for me, at least).

A quick'n'dirty method of checking whether lines need to be adjusted is to put all four on a single nail/hook and run them out to another handheld hook. Pull hard and check for one or more lines with different amount(s) of sag. You will be surprised at the tiny amount of length-difference you can detect with this method.
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#48 SkyPuppet

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 11:25 AM

If you are lucky enough to be flying where you have 2 perpendicular sides of a chain link fence handy, and 2 carabiners, you can easily stretch your lines.

Take a carabiner, clip it to your lines and to one side of the fence. Stretch your lines, clip the free ends to the other carabiner and to the other side of the fence. Walk away and do something else for 20 minutes or so. Using fence with 2 perpendicular sides will allow you to do this without taking up too much space.

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