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Rogue Ferrue


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#1 sthorson

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Posted 20 April 2011 - 10:10 AM

I was out fly my Rev 1.5 3wrap rods when the kite fell out of the sky. after taking out the leading edge come to find out the bonding agent that holds the ferrule in had leg go. So now I have a center shaft with one good end on it. any suggestions on how to get the ferrule out and what bonding agent I should use to reattach it?


Steve :sign_kitelife:
Steve

#2 Jeepster

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Posted 20 April 2011 - 10:14 AM

Steve,

You might check out this thread.

Cheers,
Tom

#3 sthorson

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 09:39 AM

Steve,

You might check out this thread.

Cheers,
Tom


Steve

#4 sthorson

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 09:44 AM

Tom,
Thanks for your help. I went home last evening took the leading edge out of my kite bag. Cleaned the ferrules and the inside the shafts.
Im sitting there thinking what would work the best to hold this. Then it hit me Super Glue. I let it set up for 30 mins, took the kite out and it worked Great!!!


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#5 --Pete

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 10:53 AM

Superglue (cyanoacrylate) is a very common construction component for kiters.

Works best in situations where there is a close (but not super-tight) contact between surfaces. There needs to be a slight gap. (No gap; no room for glue.)

It pulls into a thin gap by capillary action so it is well-suited for situations where you assemble the parts and then add the glue to the edge of the gap. (There are "thick" versions of superglue that don't pull into gaps well, but have some filling ability for larger gaps.)

If you intend to put glue on all the joint surfaces before assembly, you have to be quick and sure; otherwise you may find the glue setting up before you can get them completely assembled. There are "retarders" that will slightly slow the setup time. There are also "accelerators" that will speed it up; high humidity or breathing on the wet glue will also speed the setup.

It is often called "one-ton" or "two-ton" glue as though this is something to be proud of. It means that it would take 2000 or 4000 pounds to separate one-inch square objects glued together with it. Actually most other glues are MUCH stronger than that - epoxies, particularly. However, other glues don't set up so quickly, and are rarely thin enough to "suck" into thin gaps by capillary action.

If you intend to do something critical (like gluing a ferrule into an expensive - or not quickly replaceable - spar) you might find something similar to experiment on or practice first. (Although it sounds like you got it right on your spar.)
--Pete
(sesquipedalian man)




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