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Broke my Rev


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#1 JPB

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 04:43 PM

It was bound to happen I guess. The winds were fairly steady with gusts that were unpredictable at best. I had my hardest crash yet and after checking the kite and launching again I noticed I could hear a squeak. At first I didn't think much of it due to the geese and seagulls all around me.Then the right wing folded in on itself and the kite did a crazy death flop to the ground. Not knowing what was going on I just let go of the handles and let gravity take over. After straightening the bridal I tried to put the right spar back into the mid section.It took me a few minutes to figure out why I couldn't get them together. The male ferrule had slipped all the way into the mid section.I have already talked to Theresa and if I cant get this one out I will have to order one.


Joe

#2 Jeepster

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 05:05 PM

JPB,

If the rods are not broken, then do this. Take one of your non-ferruled tubes (rod) and align it with the tube that has the pushed in ferrule ... just like it looks when installed in the leading edge. Now tape it very securely in that position. Take the joined piece and imagine that it is an arrow shaft. Now strike the open end firmly on a piece of wood ... like you are going to drive the arrow shaft right through the board.

The non-ferruled tube will support the ferruled tube and provide a place for the ferrule to exit the center rod. Don't worry if it goes too far into the non-ferruled tube, since it's easy to get it out with one end open. If you want to check progress simply insert a thin dowel into the non-ferruled tube to check the position of the ferrule.

Cheers,
Tom

PS ... double check the security of the center ferrules every so often ... they do come lose.

#3 JPB

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 05:30 PM

Jeepster,

Thanks for the tip I'm giving it a try now. (giving you the Jeep wave)


Joe

#4 JPB

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 06:12 PM

It worked like a charm. Now, do I need to add a drop of super glue or epoxy to keep it from slipping back in again.Or should I just leave it the way it is.


Joe

#5 Jim Foster

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 06:49 PM

I always clean the old glue from the ferrule, then put a piece of tape around the ferrule so that it can not slip too far into the spar, and apply your glue of choice on the ferrule and slide it into the spar.

I use super glue others have their own glue of choice.

Check the other ferrule to be sure that it is not loose. If one came loose, the other may not be far behind. I have been able to remove the other ferrule and slide a piece of welding rod down the spar to remove a ferrule that has slipped all the way in.

Jeepster's way of removing the ferrule really works.

Ain't he somethin'?
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#6 AldenMiler

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 07:21 PM

I use five minute epoxy to reattach the ferrule. Tape it where you want it to stop, spread some epoxy on the inside of the spar with a q-tip and apply plenty to the ferrule also. Have some acetone handy to clean up the inevitable ooze out of extra epoxy. Also since you already have one ferrule in the spar be prepared for the one you are putting in to push it's way back out while the glue dries. I just tape the spar to a woodworking clamp and adjust the clamp so the ferrule can't push back out. No pressure needed on the clamp, just a stopping place to keep the ferrule in position.


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#7 --Pete

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 07:36 PM

... a piece of welding rod ...


You speak to me! One of the most useful and versatile materials in the world is TIG filler rod in 316 or 316L Stainless Steel. It comes in 3-foot lengths, in sizes:

1/8" - about like clothes-hanger wire size, but MUCH stiffer. You need strong pliers and/or a vise to bend and shape this. Things made of 1/8 are SOLID!

3/32" - about 1/2 (actually 9/16ths) the cross section of the 1/8. Easy to work with pliers and maybe the most versatile size.


1/16" - one quarter the cross section of 1/8; bend it with your fingers; make intricate shapes with pliers or bending jigs; wrap into loops and coils.

Because 316 is the finest grade of Stainless Steel, it will never rust or leave stains. Very strong. A few lengths of each size are essential materials for the guy (or gal) who wants to be ready for anything.

You can get 316 SS filler rod at any good welding supply shop. (The lower grades - 304 and the like - are useful, but not nearly as rust- and corrosion-resistant as the 316 series.)




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#8 Jeepster

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 09:14 PM

It worked like a charm. Now, do I need to add a drop of super glue or epoxy to keep it from slipping back in again. ...

Super, glad it worked for you.

Looks like Jim and Alden gave you good advice. Clean as much of the old stuff as possible, wet the interior of the rod with epoxy (if you use CA, then use some of the new non-brittle stuff), cover the ferrule with epoxy, insert to depth, clean off the ooze and tape till dry. Check it after about 20 minutes ... if some more has ooze out you can still get it off by scraping. If you wait overnight it'll be hard as a rock.

Rev ferrules take a beating, so do all you can to make sure they are glued solidly in place.

The day after Kite Party, Laura took out her Zen to fly since the winds were very light. One of her ferrules was pushed in till it was flush. Neither Jim nor I could get it out on the beach. So, Laura flew all the way across the USA, paid for an extra night at the hotel and couldn't fly the kite she needed just 'cuz of a loose ferrule. Make sure your ferrule doesn't come loose at a critical time.

@Jim ... thanks for the compliment ... better than being called eccentric.

Cheers,
Tom

#9 Jim Foster

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 09:47 PM

@Jim ... thanks for the compliment ... better than being called eccentric.

Cheers,
Tom


Geez,,,,,I wasn't going to let that cat out of the bag.

Oh well, it's out now.
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#10 --Pete

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Posted 31 March 2011 - 03:49 AM

...cover the ferrule with epoxy, insert to depth, clean off the ooze and tape till dry. Check it after about 20 minutes ... if some more has ooze out you can still get it off by scraping. If you wait overnight it'll be hard as a rock....


The "clean-off" is very important.

You need a sharp, square shoulder where the ferrule goes into the spar, because the joining spar MUST seat solidly and flush against its mate.

In almost any other glue job, a small fillet or curved ramp between the glued parts would add strength to the joint.

In this case, a fillet would act as a wedge, tending to split the outer spar if it is jammed hard against the joint (as in an "end-crash" against the ground).



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#11 Jim Foster

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Posted 31 March 2011 - 08:13 AM

In this case, a fillet would act as a wedge, tending to split the outer spar if it is jammed hard against the joint (as in an "end-crash" against the ground).


There is one other thing you should check. Inspect the end of the spar that was over the ferrule that slipped inside,, as it may have breaks or splits in it. If it has, it can be repaired with a little epoxy on the inside, and can be used any place in the frame except where that end would slide over a ferrule.
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