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#1 tommylurvebus

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 03:41 PM

Hey folks. I need some advise. Can you put dry lube onto Icarex safely. I have a can of Mclube Sail Coat. I bought it after reading a thread else where on this forum. I use Mclube to keep my lines slippy, to lube the dracon leading edge under sand caps and have used on my rods.
I only got my first Rev 6months ago. B series standard sail. I basically flew it to disintegration. The top panel beneath mesh has wear holes that are down to the "cloth" I wore holes in the leading edge and under the rods in several places. This was caused by many many sand flying hours, literally 200+ of hours of gaining experience, a poorly tuned sail and general lack of skills except in the crashing department. That sail is all fixed up and held together with teldar tape.
Anyhow when I bought my second Rev, I reinforced and applied dry lube sail kote to the leading edge I also applied the lube to the sail itself in the area where the sail contacts the vertical spars. It has worked well . All seems ok and after many hours of flying not a sign of wear, not even a mark. I have treated my full vent with the same product, which by the way has no Teflon or petroleum and is made for marine industry to lube,prevent wear, prevent mildew and waterproof rigging and sail cloth and just about everything.
So I got my fist Bazzer pro recently." Save it for best"I thought." Only fly it in good conditions, dry sunny summer evenings on soft lush thistle free grass with not a yappy hoping dog in miles" A few hours a week in the summer season" I thought. No chance. That kite wont stay in the bag. Im even taking a day out from work tomorrow to go out and fly it some more I am going fly this kite until one of drops.
Dont think wearing holes in the leading edge will be a problem as the pro has lovely slippy material reinforcements in all the right places but what about the sail itself. I certainly dont want teldar tape on my perfect new sail.
I am hoping there are some kite tech heads out there with an unhealthy interest in polycarbonate film coatings.
I know the stock B series sail is made of ripstop polyester which I assume has a polycarb coating. How do you know if this coating is worn away? Is it as with my standard sail that you can actually see the fabric with no shinny stuff covering it? How thick is the polycarb coat, is it only on the surface or is the fabric soaked in it? How easy is to damage?
Ok thats alot of questions. The main issue is that the pro is made from top quality Icarex which is different to the ordinary sails. But how different. Is it brand name only. Or do the 2 fabrics have different coatings.
Of course I can ask Bazzer but. A.... he may not be familiarized with Mc Lube and I know some of you guys are. And B. Poor bloke makes revs eats sleeps makes more revs and then repeats. He has had several PM s from me in the last few months and I dont want him to feel hassled. After all he is nearly British.
Thanks for reading x tommy

Edited by tommylurvebus, 24 January 2011 - 11:59 PM.

tommy harrison

#2 Jonesey

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 12:44 PM

Tommy...

I was probably one of the first to advocate using McLube on here .. Having worked for several Sailmakers in a previous life it's a product I was very familiar with .. In fact it's branded 'sailkote' when sold to Sailmakers. The base product is sold in many variations in many vertical markets ..pretty sure I read it was used to lubricate steam catapults on aircraft carriers! ... Anyway ... Sailors use it as a general lubricant including coating dinghy hulls, as chaff/friction protection on cruising sails etc. On spinnaker nylons/polyesters (of which Icarex is one) it's great for reducing friction where a sail is dragged into a spinnaker chute on a dinghy which can be pretty analogous to some of the abuse we put our Revs through ...as well as helping shed water quickly .. Very useful up North where you are ;)

It does wear off so I give my sails a coating a couple of times a season as well as my lines and of course those who know me will confirm my shoulders get a regular coating too ;)

#3 tommylurvebus

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 01:53 PM

Hey Jonesey mate thanks for info. Good to hear that you are safely using it on Your revs. Guess I just needed to hear a voice of experience. Even if it does come from the deep south. You are very lucky living so close to the southern ocean and PortsmouthPosted Image.
Lets face it we could all do with a little less friction in our lives and on our sails. As I said it does seem to have worked a treat on my stock sails but I do like to fuss and worry.
Cheers for taking the time to reply.
Do you ever meet and fly with others on the south coast? It is within striking distance and I intend to try to Fly with others in the spring and summer if I can. I got lots to learn.
You know what they say." Man with Mclube on his shoulders have no chips".
tommy harrison

#4 Jonesey

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 03:17 PM

Hey Jonesey mate thanks for info. Good to hear that you are safely using it on Your revs. Guess I just needed to hear a voice of experience. Even if it does come from the deep south. You are very lucky living so close to the southern ocean and PortsmouthPosted Image.
Lets face it we could all do with a little less friction in our lives and on our sails. As I said it does seem to have worked a treat on my stock sails but I do like to fuss and worry.
Cheers for taking the time to reply.
Do you ever meet and fly with others on the south coast? It is within striking distance and I intend to try to Fly with others in the spring and summer if I can. I got lots to learn.
You know what they say." Man with Mclube on his shoulders have no chips".



Please 'come on down' .. There are quite a few of us lucky enough to live and fly down here where the winds are clean and the sky's blue .. Of course if you are in North London you might have to head up the M1 to that boil on the buttocks of England they call Dunstable Downs .. But quite frankly I wouldn't recommend it they'll make you eat cake and get fat ... Then there's always the Blackheath posse but thats a whole other story :kid_devlish:

#5 --Pete

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 09:09 PM

I just ordered two 16 oz cans of McLube Sailkote (from Jamestown Distributors). i can think of a LOT of things this would be good for: the insides of my snowblower; the face of the snowplow blade on my Bobcat; my foul-weather gear; and, just maybe, my Revs (if I ever happen to want to fly them in the wet or the mud). Thanks for the tip!
--Pete
(sesquipedalian man)

#6 tommylurvebus

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 11:22 PM

I just ordered two 16 oz cans of McLube Sailkote (from Jamestown Distributors). i can think of a LOT of things this would be good for: the insides of my snowblower; the face of the snowplow blade on my Bobcat; my foul-weather gear; and, just maybe, my Revs (if I ever happen to want to fly them in the wet or the mud). Thanks for the tip!


Lots of wet and mud over here Pete. I suggest a test patch on your Revs first as it is easy to over apply. You only need a small amount to get the full benefits. Its great also to help rods slide onto ferels inside leading edge.
tommy harrison

#7 tommylurvebus

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 11:26 PM

Please 'come on down' .. There are quite a few of us lucky enough to live and fly down here where the winds are clean and the sky's blue .. Of course if you are in North London you might have to head up the M1 to that boil on the buttocks of England they call Dunstable Downs .. But quite frankly I wouldn't recommend it they'll make you eat cake and get fat ... Then there's always the Blackheath posse but thats a whole other story :kid_devlish:


Ah blue sky and clean winds . Now thats my cup of tea. Think its time to move before the Cake and Boils take hold.Posted Image
tommy harrison

#8 --Pete

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 05:56 AM

Lots of wet and mud over here Pete. I suggest a test patch on your Revs first as it is easy to over apply. You only need a small amount to get the full benefits. Its great also to help rods slide onto ferels inside leading edge.


The McLube SailKote Application Guide at Jamestown Distributors seems to indicate that it is almost as easy to under apply as to over apply. They say that the sail should appear "wet" for 5 to 15 seconds. If it never appears wet, then it is too little (or possibly the sprayer is too far away and the SailKote is drying too much before it hits the sail); if it looks wet for longer, then you have applied too much.

They are describing applying bulk SailKote with a spray gun, not an aerosol can, so use the distance listed on the can rather than the 1.5 - 2 feet (45 - 60 cm) in the ApGuide.

Take seriously the advice to use a WELL-VENTILATED area. JD charged me a $3 HazMat fee, so there is some nasty solvent in there. The thinner they recommend is acetone, which is EXTREMELY FLAMMABLE and not good to breathe, either.
--Pete
(sesquipedalian man)




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