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Axel tips?


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#41 makatakam

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Posted 08 June 2013 - 08:22 PM

Will there be cookies?


Mark

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"...it's a fair wind blowin' warm, out of the south over my shoulder, guess I'll set a course and go."
CSN&Y

#42 Scott A.

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 04:00 AM

Here is a sneak peek around 50 second mark of vid , back to back left to right axels

Great example of the Axel guys

 

Speaking of Axels, another one I've been trying to do (never seen anyone doing it as yet) and its probably near impossible but what about 'back to back axels' (or near) in opposite rotation


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#43 makatakam

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 09:44 AM

If you can stop each axle half-way thru and do a half-axle in the opposite direction and keep repeating, you should be able to do a cascade.

 

By the way, nice flying!


Mark

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"...it's a fair wind blowin' warm, out of the south over my shoulder, guess I'll set a course and go."
CSN&Y

#44 Murph

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 10:01 AM

Thanks Scott ...for reminding me of your video (I had commented on it in your channel sure) ...don't know how I had forgot about seeing someone do back to back axels in both directions. And also spotted John doing a few back to back opposite axels under tress on one of the Rev DVD videos too.
 
Anyways since being on the forum last, nothing to focus the mind than reading about other Rev flyers attempts at banging their heads off the same wall as oneself LOL ...I went out that very same afternoon and managed to have lots of success in adding to my lil bag of tricks, in as much as axels go.
 
Cleaned up my axels in both directions, also multiple clean axels in each direction, then back-to-back axels in opposite directions (still slightly over rotating ...but whats a couple degrees amongst friends) and in much the same as dualie kiters do, those half-axels to do a 180 turn (say at the edge of the window) and fly back in the other direction, I can do something like it now at each edge with a Rev, all be it with an extra 1/4 turn to bring the kite back around to allow it to fly back and pull off the same but opposite move on the other side. I'd reckon more of an axel and a quarter than anything else. All-in-all was quite pleased with what I had achieved that day ...sorta brought me back to when I was starting out, when every single time I went out flying I learned lots and lots.
 
Hopefully a video soon ...gotta have proof eh?! LOL
 
And as for a Rev cascade?! are we talking about full axel or 1/2 axels i.e lots of opposite 1/2 axels same as on dual liners?! Its certainly a sight to behold when you see a dual line doing it, but with a Rev?! Can it be done ...a cascade of full opposite axels maybe but 1/2 axels ...mmmm!? ...I'm not sure I can quite get my head around that one.
 
Next up Flic-flacs ...and then Flic-flacs to an axel LOL
 
Chris

#45 REVflyer

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 10:45 AM

after almost a decade of trying, my axels still don't look like Scott Weider's



#46 kwmf

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 10:22 PM

For me, unless the rev is facing the ground during it's rotation it's not an axel - it's nothing more than yanking a line and letting the kite 'bicycle spin' with slack lines (which to my eye is neither pretty nor a trick).

 

By my own standards, my axel attempts fail more often than not ... but I don't work on it too often since it's hard to get it flat (as it should be) and the chances of a person not knowlegable about revs understanding it are very small.



#47 REVflyer

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 11:29 AM

Practice makes perfect, it seems unreasonable to do only things that are easy.  

 

If you can identify a personal weakness then make it your strength you are pushing the limits, the understanding or appreciation of others is not important in your growth.  I want the skill to execute any Rev maneuver or trick, but at some point in my past history I could neither hold a hover inverted or back it up at all.  We strive to improve and only thru practice will you get better.  Of course our early efforts at slack line tricks are ugly, as were our first efforts about speaking or walking, heck we even learned bladder/bowel control but only after many months in diapers!

 

Tip stab axel launch, (repeatable in both directions!)



#48 kwmf

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 12:53 PM

I agree that a preference is a weakness... Merely explaining why axels are low priority to me at present :-)

#49 makatakam

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 08:00 PM

A tip stab axel launch using a Supersonic should be fairly easy.


Mark

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"...it's a fair wind blowin' warm, out of the south over my shoulder, guess I'll set a course and go."
CSN&Y

#50 SkyPuppet

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 01:15 PM

For me, unless the rev is facing the ground during it's rotation it's not an axel - it's nothing more than yanking a line and letting the kite 'bicycle spin' with slack lines (which to my eye is neither pretty nor a trick).


Another tricky thing to consider - your perspective and vantage point. Your axel could very well be perfectly flat to the ground, but if it isn't done at eye level (or camera lense level) it might look skewed.

Have Rev, Will Travel

 

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#51 kwmf

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Posted 14 July 2013 - 01:23 AM

Even flying shapes will look different from different perspectives, yet the shape is still flown from the pilot perspective.

#52 stroke survivor

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Posted 14 July 2013 - 06:28 AM

I'm agreeing with Steven - Mine look a lot as he described!! I keep wanting to get the kite flatter, but haven't come up with a reliable solution - yet!! So I understand the basics of the move. still working on getting it to look good!!


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#53 Dean750

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Posted 19 July 2013 - 07:27 PM

Flat axles are a matter of grace. Grace takes practice. Believe me when I say I had a thought on this subject that might have been helpful and forgot where I was going with this after "Grace takes practice." DOHHH!!



#54 mystainedskin

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Posted 24 November 2013 - 11:42 PM


Hi ahofer,

Let's break it down into the different parts and look at each piece in detail.

We start out in an inverted slide (other entries are possible, but we will stick with this for ease of explaining). The first part is the tug on the outside edge. This part of the axel is very much similar to a "samurai slide." To practice this first tug, slide along the window, and pull the leading corner slowly back towards your hip. What you will see happening, is that the kite will become much more flat, and more or less glide across the window. You will also see the trailing edge of the kite give a slight ripple. Maintaining that glide is knows as the "samurai slide," and at any time during it, it is easy to snap into an axel. This flattened glide gets a large amount of the air out of the sail and get's the kite into a somewhat flat position to be ready for the axel. This really helps to get the axel to be more flat.

The next part is a large pull on the inside edge. This is just to start the rotation. A large pull is necessary to get the full spin.

Next, you must follow through. You will notice that both Rich and myself will move our hands with the kite as it rotates. I think of this as more of a precaution. The reason for this is that if the kite is not rotating enough, you can often give it a bit of a nudge while you follow through.

The preferred method of an axel would be an under-axel. An under-axel is the flat-spin equivalent to an under-turn 180. In an under-turn 180, half way through the turn, the leading edge of the kite is facing down. So, for instance, if you are traveling from left to right, your axel would be a clockwise rotation. Whether you are doing a clockwise or counter-clockwise is entirely a flier's preference. I am right handed, so I do the majority of my axels moving from left to right (clockwise rotation) because this places the larger tug in my right hand.



That is part of it, yes. After 3/4 of the rotation, the leading edge will curve away from you and glide back. Another reason that people use it to gain ground is that since it is a flat spin, we do not want air to be filling up the sail. So, if there is a breeze, the wind will get under the kite and try to pull it up, making it less flat. So, a low amount of wind is needed to do it. Those of you that have seen me do an axel in high winds have seen me very quickly move forward a few yards. In order to pull it off, the wind relative to the kite must be somewhat calm.

I hope this helps,
Watty

I Know this is older...but pertained to me at the moment. I have seen the video several times and have been working on getting these down. 

Last night I got to reading here ....which I don't do too often. Trying to change that :) I read this and really thought about what was being said and my prior movements. So tonight I was determined to get it...regardless of the steady NE@26mph and me being right on the ocean. Out came the Vented B2 and I started working a real good Samurai slide on the edge of the window. That one little first pop...sets the whole stage. I am tickled pink...Got my 1st repeatable FLAT axle in such strong wind. Still need work but how nice!

Kudos for sharing and breaking it down in word form. ;)


 

#55 Murph

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 10:12 AM

Doing axels on a RevII are a delight ...maybe not in very strong winds mind you!

 

...do try it in more moderate ones though, especially if its vented II ...a friend of mine had one, trying it out I could do double axels on one pop, until my arms hurt :)

 

Chris






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