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#1 tommylurvebus

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 12:54 PM

Time for some shorter lines. I have a spare set of laser pro gold 90Lb 80ft lines that i want to cut to 50 and 30ft in order to speed things up a bit and get me twitching. I have never made up lines before and have seen several sleeve diameters for sale on the net. Dont know which size will fit my lines. They have up to 3mm but that sounds a bit large to me. How important is it to get sleeve size correct when making up lines? Can anyone help?

Thanks . tommy.

Edited by tommylurvebus, 30 October 2010 - 12:56 PM.

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#2 RevWizard

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 01:43 PM

I prefer the smallest that will still fit over the lines and you can get the feed wire(or whatever it may be called) through.

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#3 Mike

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 02:37 PM

You can even skip the sleeving entirely. I both sleeved and unsleeved line sets and have no problems with the unsleeved lines.
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#4 --Pete

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 05:29 PM

In general, a knot reduces the strength of a line by 30-60% depending on the diameter and the material. Sleeving reduces the amount of weakening.

Sleeving (if properly done) also reduces the tendency of modern slippery lines to slide through the knot. "Properly done" is important here; if done wrong, it can actually increase the likelihood of the line sliding through the knot.

Neither of these characteristics of sleeving may have a great deal of importance for Rev flyers who specialize in light-wind flying, or who can switch to higher degrees of venting in higher winds. I learned this flying single and dual line kites in winds where a surprise gust could snap 500# flying lines. I weigh 260 currently, and have weighed at least 220 for as long as I've been flying; leaning back with my shoulderblades a foot off the ground, I can put a LOT of tension on a set of lines. (And sometimes I get dragged; learning to safely land a kite while sliding along on your belly is a whole 'nother thing.) In another thread here, I mentioned "tweaking" the metal ferrule of the leading edge center spar on an early Rev I. I did that in the air, not by crashing it. It simply started to fold up in the air.

Sleeving also reduces the likelihood of cutting the line by whatever it is looped around. Not so much of an issue in these days where almost all connections are made with lark's-heads. When temporary or adjustable connections were done with clips, it made a lot of sense to sleeve lines. I expect that a LPE (linear polyethylene) line lark's-headed to a Dacron bridle might benefit from sleeving; otherwise a few hard jerks could weaken the line by melting it.
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#5 tommylurvebus

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 11:31 PM

Thanks. I will use sleeving as pulling out larks head knots on cold winter days is already a challenge for wind chilled fingers. Thanks for the info guys. I will go thin and hope the 30ft set will keep me warm and on my toes.

Cheers t
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#6 Mike

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Posted 31 October 2010 - 08:47 AM

Thanks. I will use sleeving as pulling out larks head knots on cold winter days is already a challenge for wind chilled fingers. Thanks for the info guys. I will go thin and hope the 30ft set will keep me warm and on my toes.

Cheers t


On my unsleeved lines I knot a small bead on the end of the loop. It makes it easy to pull out the knot.
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#7 tommylurvebus

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Posted 31 October 2010 - 12:44 PM

ingenious Posted Image
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#8 Baloo

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Posted 31 October 2010 - 01:14 PM

All the sleeving I have done on 90lb lines I have used LPG 100lb Bridle line and pulled the middle out of it to make it into sleeving.

Not sure if this is the cheapest / best way to make sleeving. However I think this is the way quite a lot of folks do it.

Best of luck in making up the linesets, it is a useful skill to learn.

#9 tommylurvebus

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Posted 31 October 2010 - 01:54 PM

Cheers Mr B. i am fairly confident and its always good to save a few pennies. I am sure the new shorter lengths will sharpen up my reflexes and require a different more energetic approach, but of course if it all gets a bit to much i can always skip back to my spare slick and new 80ft set. When i am good enough to fly with others i shall buy a spool and make up some 120s but for now i will just nip and tuck what i have.
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#10 Baloo

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Posted 01 November 2010 - 02:41 AM

You will find that 30, 50, 80 and eventually 120 linesets will cover pretty much anything you want to do.

I have sets in all those lengths, oh and 15, 100, and a couple more I don't know the length of. All in LPG now. Have a few sets in 150lb too.

I just tend to go with whichever set takes my fancy. On occasions if there is enough room I will set up 2 or 3 sets of lines with various kites on so I can ring the changes if I fancy it.

If you have not tried 120 as yet and get a chance to you will find how relaxed it is to fly. The longer lines slow the kite down a bit, and you have a BIG wind window to practice all those mistakes in. :kid_devlish:

#11 kwmf

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Posted 01 November 2010 - 03:25 AM

@Baloo
You're the first person I've seen who runs the same pattern as me - 30, 50 and 80. The difference is you have 120's and I have 20's instead.



#12 tommylurvebus

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Posted 01 November 2010 - 12:04 PM

Like the idea of that big window may need some glasses though B Posted Image
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#13 stroke survivor

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Posted 01 November 2010 - 01:51 PM

You'll like the longer lines!! :) Things happen at a different pace when you use that length, plus the window is sooo much larger!! :) Don't know how your vision is - glasses optional!! :devil:

wayne from portland
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#14 tommylurvebus

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Posted 02 November 2010 - 02:00 PM

will certainly be giving the long distance lines a go. look forward to taking up the real estate.
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#15 SkyPuppet

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Posted 01 July 2011 - 11:51 AM

On my unsleeved lines I knot a small bead on the end of the loop. It makes it easy to pull out the knot.


I like having a tab to pull as well, especially on 50#!
I have found that its easier to tie decent-sized loops at the ends, get everything equalized, and then larks head little loops onto that:

Posted Image

Then Larks head these onto your double overhand loops:

Posted Image

That way, you don't have to worry about getting the knot for the tab AND the loops equalized, just the loops, and the tabs don't have to be completely identical in length either.

Hope this helps ;)

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#16 stroke survivor

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Posted 01 July 2011 - 08:36 PM

Been using a system like this for a while now!! I'll make the tabs large so I can get them on the loop, but then I tie a knot at maybe a 1/2" and cutoff the rest!! Less chance of snagging a smaller tab!! I do it on both ends, makes dis-assembly a snap!!!

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#17 tommylurvebus

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Posted 03 July 2011 - 11:52 AM

I like this idea a lot although knot pulling on my sleeved lines is a breeze in the summer. Dont find I am using my 30ft lines much. The kite just seems to close to really be using the wind if you get what I mean. The 50ft lines are out lots and I love the way they encourage me to move and almost dance with the kite. Still dont have those 120s yet but its always nice to have new doors left to open.
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#18 dazlarsen

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Posted 03 July 2011 - 01:00 PM

Get some 120's for Dunstable and fly with the rest of the UK rev heads
All the best

Daz

#19 JasonOsteo

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Posted 03 July 2011 - 01:33 PM

yep. 120's are the way forward. Flying with others 'in formation' is great for learning.

Although, I do think we have been getting a little ambitious for both our skills and wind conditions in the last couple of weeks. Did some great line platts thoughPosted Image, nine sets of lines get rather 'heavy' like that.
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#20 tommylurvebus

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Posted 03 July 2011 - 01:48 PM

Get some 120's for Dunstable and fly with the rest of the UK rev heads


Still a bit nervous for the group fly. Have been flying alone so long I have developed a bald patch and become a hermit. Will see if I can get some 120s ordered (run it by the wife) Get a few hours on them and come get tangled.
tommy harrison




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