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Blast anti snag lines


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#1 kwmf

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Posted 30 August 2010 - 01:03 AM

Hi there

This is mostly aimed at REVFlyer since he was the one I saw mention this and post a picture (which I've re-attached), but I'd like to hear from anyone really...

How do you rig up an anti-snag line for the blast?

I imagine it's just a larks over the end cap, through the 2 lower vertical end caps, up behind the sail and through the center loop at the leading edge, back down to the 2 lower verticals and up to the other leading edge end cap which is attached with a larks.

In the picture I see the line is reasonably tight with no perceivable slack, which is obviously how one would want it. Is there enough movement to allow you to disassemble the kite or is there some trick to having it tight for flying and then slacking it off for packing away?


While on the topic of the anti-snag line ....
I have the red/grey/black version of the Blast and I'm undecided which colour line to run. I have red, grey and hi-viz yellow. The red and grey match the sail perfectly, with the grey likely to be the most invisible of the two. The yellow REALLY stands out and is much brighter than the center diamond, I just worry about it getting dirty and not having the same pop.

So sound off on my little informal poll and let me know what colour would look best Posted Image

Steven

Attached Thumbnails

  • Anti_Snag_100#_line.jpg
  • red_yellow-diamond1.jpg


#2 REVflyer

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Posted 30 August 2010 - 02:51 AM

the trick line can't slip when in flight, or you'll have excessive abrasion against the caps, so each line is larksheaded to it's cap. A prussik knot works even better, but try to position the closure part inside the end-cap (as much as possible). disassembly is still possible after you release the elastic on the downspars

Color?
want to show?
Use the yellow line and replace it when it gets filthy. My style? I'd use the gray and lose all concern about cleanliness.

#3 kwmf

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Posted 30 August 2010 - 02:56 AM

So if I understand right, each segment is its own seperate line ... making for 5 or 6 segments, depending on if you have 2 segments or 1 throught the center?

#4 REVflyer

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Posted 30 August 2010 - 03:49 AM

no SIR,
Use a single piece of line, larksheaded to each end-cap, all the way around, except not crossing over the bottom center. Instead it's up to the middle of the leading edge and positioned behind the fabric (see the photo). No knots except at the start and end points = less opportunities to snag a flying line.

Start on one end, say the outer down spar, up on top at the leading edge. Larkshead onto that end-cap using the same technique as a bridle. Thread your trick line thru the outer cap on the top corner next , carefully weaving your trickline around creating enough restriction to confirm acceptability (do not distort the frame through excessive tension).

Carefully examine your efforts to insure you're NOT wrapping around the bridle or elastic tensioning lines, Insure your trick line is not significantly exposed where abrasion could sever the trick-line when doing tip stabs too. When you have the tension correct, then go to the next location and repeat the process until you've been all the way around to the outside down spar on the opposite side of the kite.

#5 kwmf

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Posted 30 August 2010 - 04:27 AM

Ah, when you said larks to each end cap you mean just the leading edge end caps and not the ones on the verticals ... confusion in terminology.

Would you be able to take a closer photo of your leading edge and vertical end caps (just 1 of each, not the whole lot) for me so I can get a good look at it?

I really love the Blast but can see massive snag potential, so I want to do this right.

#6 REVflyer

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Posted 31 August 2010 - 03:02 AM

Hi Steven, I think a PDF sketch from the magic sticks diagram may prove insightful. See the end-cap on the top right of the illustration for the best solution. (it's also the most time consuming!)

Text explanation: As you thread that single piece of hi-test bridle line thru each cap,
don't just use a straight path, each end-cap would act like a tin can's toothy edge, effectively chewing through the line in short order.

Instead you'll wrap around the back of the cap and travel back through that same side
(from the front ~ thru the cap~ 'round the back ~ out again, back towards the flier).
This will halt any potential movements down enough to slow abrasion to the cheater/trick line.

Remember though, the purpose of the cheater is to stop snagged flying lines, which catch on the back of the sail. It will be tight, then loose, then suddenly jerked upon very sharply. You may want to wrap around the back of each of the end caps TWICE.

Options:
~ When you have flown the kite several times and adjusted the tension to prevent any frame warp or in-flight distortions, then and only then
"paint the cheater line" behind the caps with black nail polish, . . . locking 'em into perfect position.

~ You might also want to smooth out the entry (and exit) hole of the end cap with a carefully applied emory board,
(the misses surely has an old one to donate to you kite bag tool kit)

~ I'd strongly recommend you dump the flying line sleeving too, instead using a stopper knot built into the attachment loop connecting to your kite's bridle.

~ Longer throw handles will make the flipping inside-out trick much easier, particularly with a kite as large as the Blast. You may need to execute the trick from reverse flight, then flick-flaking from this set-up position. The Super Sonic does this technique very rapidly, almost as fast as you can think flick the handles. The blast is going to be slower (but with a much louder P_O_P when the sail finally powers back up again!)

You may need to really "step forward into the technique" when first practicing, to get quarter turn flick-flaks with a Blast but it surely would look great when you have it down & polished. AND, the sound will travel enough for folks to jerk around wandering what the heck are you up to over there?

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#7 kwmf

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Posted 31 August 2010 - 06:26 AM

Thanks for that ...

I think putting in a wrap or two to help retard any wear to the anti-snag line may be a worthwhile effort. Another option I can see is going straight through, but applying some tape or something similar to a straight through line for protection - any thoughts on that?

#8 REVflyer

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Posted 31 August 2010 - 07:35 AM

Reinforcement the wrap with tape?, it will soon wiggle free, right? Eventually sawing all the way thru, a useless long-term solution + a gummy mess catching sand & dirt until that failure day arrives.

either you stopped the friction/abrasion on your equipment or you're allowing a false sense of security to take root.

Double wrap the cap, at least the back half of it,
or
larkshead to the back half of the cap,
or
pussik knot to the back half of the cap.

#9 kwmf

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Posted 31 August 2010 - 07:38 AM

Roger that ...

Nice to be able to ask others who have tried so I can save myself the time of going through it all :)

#10 REVflyer

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Posted 31 August 2010 - 10:56 AM

sometimes the only thing gained by doing the experimenting yourself is knowledge, (maybe about what didn't work-out at all!) You'd have figured it out in short order without my input anyway, if you saw the darn trick line fraying right before your eyes.

My local kite club has played with lots of variables over the years, some worked so super they are incorporated into everything I own, others were lesson in futility that we'll never try again!

Here's Dave Ashworth's indoor blast(er) just as an example of what's possible if you do-it-yourself. He's an amazing innovator you've probably never heard of (HA!) The photo also shows his indoor Spirit and 1point6 knockoffs,... all 3 kite designs are mostly made out of Orcon.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Dave\'s indoor quads copy.JPG





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