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#1 stevepigeon

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Posted 23 March 2010 - 12:20 PM

i need to replace the screening and the leading edge what is the material for leading edge sleve made out of thanks in advance
Steve & Sherri

#2 John F

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Posted 23 March 2010 - 08:58 PM

i need to replace the screening and the leading edge what is the material for leading edge sleve made out of thanks in advance


I replaced the screen on couple of my kites. Got the screening from The Kite Shoppe. It is the same screening as what rev uses. She could sell you about 10 or 12 inch wide strip that is long enough for the kite.

The job takes about 4 hours. I used sewing glue to hold the new screen in place before sewing. Not too difficult but takes a lot of patience. There are alot of stitches to rip out. Get yourself a good stitch ripping tool and take your time. It would be very easy to puncture your sail.

John

#3 Jeepster

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Posted 24 March 2010 - 09:23 AM

i need to replace the screening and the leading edge what is the material for leading edge sleve made out of thanks in advance


If the sail is an SUL, then 1.5oz nylon is appropriate for the sleeve. Otherwise, 3.9oz dacron is the correct choice.

Since Theresa is on the other coast, you might check out your local brand X big-box store (Lowes, Home Depot, etc) for window screening. My local Ace hardware does screen repair and has an assortment of screening material. I bought a length of the softest screening in the correct color that they had on hand.

You might ask Jim Foster for his screen replacement/repair technique. It will save you lots of time if the screen has to be replaced a second time. If he hadn't pointed out the fix on his kite, I'd of never guessed it wasn't straight from the factory.

Good luck,
Tom

#4 REVflyer

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Posted 29 March 2010 - 04:01 AM

For the last several years I have ordered all my kites, (regardless of the wind range they were designed for,) with the SUL leading edge sleeve and a full set of races sticks. That material is 1-1/2 ounce nylon. It will wear thru quicker than dacron if you fly over abrasive stuff, paved roads or sidewalks, certainly sandy beaches if you're constantly dragging it inverted across the land. I live in the land of no-wind though, I need the darn thing as light as possible more often than not, I'll sacrifice durability!

I have the full suite of B-Pro kites and a ZEN (4 Icarex sails) in hot fade color with black centers. Plus 2 old glories and a flame masterpiece (3 nylon sails) each came with an SUL sleeve, all because of two guys. Bazzer and Ben are the best two things to come out of the REV factory in years.
I own 7 of barry's SUL kites so far, they are beautiful in form/function, well constructed and durable. I couldn't do it any better myself! In fact I have not made a single kite for a couple of years. These two fine gentlemen will make exactly what I have ordered thru my favorite retailer,... my colors, my choice of materials, all signed, but the best part is my fabulous bride PAYS and makes lunch for us besides!

There's also a mylar-backed nylon, it's hard to locate but makes a very fine leading edge material, it's light in weight and offers some free reflectivity to boot!

I've made leading edges using icarex, but we reinforce specific high stress areas with kevlar patches (1 sq in) bonded inside before construction. The leading edge material creates a necessary shape but adding weight (3.9 ounce dacron is against everything I stand for!) to make it seems so counterproductive. The factory over-engineers for durability intentionally and I don't blame them one bit!, their products get an abusive introduction to each new pilot. Even the old hands, as they try out new tricks and techniques, can test materials.

I hesitantly endorse the SUL leading edge as an option when you MUST push the low wind range and can afford to surrender durability to get there.

#5 Jim Foster

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Posted 29 March 2010 - 09:33 AM

You might ask Jim Foster for his screen replacement/repair technique. It will save you lots of time if the screen has to be replaced a second time. If he hadn't pointed out the fix on his kite, I'd of never guessed it wasn't straight from the factory.

Good luck,
Tom


Here you go..

Rev Leading Edge Replacement

When I replace the screen on our Revs, I assume that I will be doing it again as we fly a lot, probably more than most.

The leading edge screen is folded into the top of the sail from the factory. I rip out all of that stitching, and unfold the screen from the sail, separating the entire leading edge from the sail. Then I re-fold the sail and run a straight seam, using black thread, down the center of the entire fold. Now the sail is ready to receive the new, or repaired leading edge.

I replace the screen in the leading edge leaving it wide enough to cover the seam in the sail, about 5/16 inch, leaving open screen the same as original. I then cut a piece of black rip stop 1 1/14 inch wide and the length of the leading edge. Next I fold the edges of that strip inward to the center, and then fold at the center, making a double folded strip 5/16 wide. After sewing the new screen into the upper part of the leading edge, I put the lower edge of the screen into the fold of the rip stop strip, holding it together with a few small pieces of seam tape. Next I run a straight stitch down the center of the rip stop strip, attaching it to the screen. This can be done for each of the three sections of the leading edge separately, or all as one.

Now you have a "stand alone" leading edge and a "stand alone" sail.

Next I center the leading edge on the back side of the sail holding it with an inch or two of seam tape. Then I attach the remainder of the leading edge with small pieces seam tape every few inches. Now the leading edge can be sewn to the sail using the three stitch zig zag, sometimes referred to as "triple zig zag, the same stitch used throughout the sail. For ease of removal the next time, this can be done with white thread, so that next time you can see exactly which stitches need to be ripped. At 100 feet, no one will see or care that you used white thread.

Repair can easily be done by undoing the entire leading edge, or just one section.

I use screen from Home Depot. Works just fine.

Edited by Jim Foster, 29 March 2010 - 08:02 PM.

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#6 Jim Foster

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Posted 29 March 2010 - 09:41 AM

Another, "quick and dirty" repair is the applique method. I use this when screen replacement is not practical due to time or material constraints.

I simply sew a piece of screen to the back of the leading edge covering the torn area, using the three stitch zig zag. I then cut out the torn area from the front side of the leading edge being very careful not to cut the new screen behind.

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#7 AldenMiler

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Posted 29 March 2010 - 09:54 AM

Another, "quick and dirty" repair is the applique method. I use this when screen replacement is not practical due to time or material constraints.

I simply sew a piece of screen to the back of the leading edge covering the torn area, using the three stitch zig zag. I then cut out the torn area from the front side of the leading edge being very careful not to cut the new screen behind.



That's how I fixed the screen on "Barnacle Bill".

-Alden
"Don't go in there!" RC

#8 big bri

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 06:38 AM

Here you go..

Rev Leading Edge Replacement

When I replace the screen on our Revs, I assume that I will be doing it again as we fly a lot, probably more than most.

The leading edge screen is folded into the top of the sail from the factory. I rip out all of that stitching, and unfold the screen from the sail, separating the entire leading edge from the sail. Then I re-fold the sail and run a straight seam, using black thread, down the center of the entire fold. Now the sail is ready to receive the new, or repaired leading edge.

I replace the screen in the leading edge leaving it wide enough to cover the seam in the sail, about 5/16 inch, leaving open screen the same as original. I then cut a piece of black rip stop 1 1/14 inch wide and the length of the leading edge. Next I fold the edges of that strip inward to the center, and then fold at the center, making a double folded strip 5/16 wide. After sewing the new screen into the upper part of the leading edge, I put the lower edge of the screen into the fold of the rip stop strip, holding it together with a few small pieces of seam tape. Next I run a straight stitch down the center of the rip stop strip, attaching it to the screen. This can be done for each of the three sections of the leading edge separately, or all as one.

Now you have a "stand alone" leading edge and a "stand alone" sail.

Next I center the leading edge on the back side of the sail holding it with an inch or two of seam tape. Then I attach the remainder of the leading edge with small pieces seam tape every few inches. Now the leading edge can be sewn to the sail using the three stitch zig zag, sometimes referred to as "triple zig zag, the same stitch used throughout the sail. For ease of removal the next time, this can be done with white thread, so that next time you can see exactly which stitches need to be ripped. At 100 feet, no one will see or care that you used white thread.

Repair can easily be done by undoing the entire leading edge, or just one section.

I use screen from Home Depot. Works just fine.



I luv you guys,great advice Jim and the understatment of the year so far,,,,,,probably.
Thanks

BRIAN...AKA Albert

#9 RevWizard

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 08:13 AM

I luv you guys,great advice Jim and the understatment of the year so far,,,,,,probably.
Thanks

BRIAN...AKA Albert

The screen used by revolution usually has an inner core of fiber glass with some kind of rubbery outer coating.
There is a screen available at Home Depot in the USA that is meant for keeping animals from going through it.
I installed it once on a patio screen door. Compared to normal screen it is thick and heavier and very difficult to cut.
You need a real sharp razor knife or very sharp scissors to cut it, even then it is not very easy.
It does have an inner core which I think is Spectra fiber which is similar to or same as the fiber in your Shanti and LPG lines.
Oh yes, it is a bit more expensive.
I have no idea how easy it would sew into a REV leading edge. I would suspect it won't be that easy.

Long John (formerly Mr. R)

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