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Handling Light Winds


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#1 Kitelife

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Posted 26 April 2007 - 06:18 PM

FYI, I generally use two types of 180 turn calls...

==

"180... Now!"

Simple 180 and stop.

"180 Return... Now.. And Now!"

180 to a pause, then fly back the way you came (whichever direction that is).

==

Thing is, in good wind, I might have the guys hang out for a moment in some areas...

In really light wind, you want to keep everyone moving to some extent (no prolonged hovering), and the 180 return works really well for this.

==

Same for a ball and burst in light wind... I'd call it like this:

"Flanking up to ball, then to a slow burst..."

"Now!" (flank) "Now... And now!" (ball and burst)

==

In that last scenario, I give 3 moves in the prep call (flank/ball/burst)... Then make the turn calls in a slow to medium speed rhythm so no one is left trying to hover too long.

Having this tempo and technique, in my experience, helps a team move as one in particularly light winds. ;)

"Now" and "Go" are my typical "trigger calls".

John Barresi

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#2 lummas

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 08:11 AM

John, since I already eplied to this to you directly from home, can you do me a favor and drop that response in here to save me typing it again.

Thanks,

Mark.

#3 Kitelife

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 08:32 AM

Interesting John. We do all call similarly, but with slight adjustments. I noted when I flew with you guys that you call as below. With us for instance, we generally call each element separated. So if we are doing threads, I would do a prep call of €œflying out to the edges and stopping€. We would all fly out and then I would call €œnow€ for the stop. Then I would call €œ180 up on the spot€ and then €œnow€ to get everyone to turn around. Then I would call €œflying back through€, etc.

So similar idea, but with each segment separate. This allows me to stop in each position as long as I like. If the wind is very light, my initial prep call would describe the whole fly out, turn around and fly back plan and I would cut down the time I keep everyone holding in each position.

Hope that makes sense.

Mark


That makes total sense Mark, and leads me to believe that I may not have explained clearly.

We use very much the same technique in decent wind (sufficient wind for easy hovers)...

I switch to the rhythm when winds are light and I need to keep everyone moving. ;)

John Barresi

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#4 Stephen Hoath

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 09:57 AM

That makes total sense Mark, and leads me to believe that I may not have explained clearly.

We use very much the same technique in decent wind (sufficient wind for easy hovers)...

I switch to the rhythm when winds are light and I need to keep everyone moving. ;)



Absolutely right. Light wind equals more following and less holding. Compound calling is the way to go and if the moves enable a degree of "forward ground" making then this is even better. Such a move would be "ladder down" in a follow. The leader flies to the top of the window and flies horizontaly (using the float technique) then at the edges (actualy around 75%) they "U" down taking a few steps forward.

Has anyone used "Around the World" as a technique to gain forward ground?

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#5 Kitelife

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 10:01 AM

iQuad has not used that technique yet... We typically do one of two things:

1. Flank up, 180 clockwise at the top, fly away tip to tip in a horizontal line, gaining ground.
2. Follow up, follow through a right tip pivot one-by-one, then gain in a follow.

Obviously #2 is more effective in the lightest wind, we usually choose based on mood, appearance and flow.

Can you describe the "around the world" technique?

John Barresi

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#6 monkey

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 10:28 AM

Can you describe the "around the world" technique?



He must mean our show stoppin' team 360 :lol: \m/

Though it didnt gain any ground, just some good entertainment
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#7 Kitelife

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 10:34 AM

Yeah, that was AWESOME... If anyone wants to see it, check out the "iQuad in Tulip Town" video here:

http://iquad.us/videos.htm

John Barresi

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#8 lummas

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 10:45 AM

Whilst the 360 is spectacular, as you said, it is not the worlds greatest team forward ground gaining move!! Fun though!

The "around the world" move comes from the dual line team/mega team days and is spectacular and can gain forward ground with a 2 or 4 line kite. Let me try to explain it:

- kites follow from left to right acros the ground
- the lead kite begins an upward curve as he approaches the right edge of the window and flies a shape that flies up the right hand side of the window, across the top towards the left, down the left side and across the bottom
- the shape he flies should be a large circle
- as he does so, each of the other kites follows him in the sky through this move
- the trick is what happens on the ground
- as the lead kite flies across the ground initially, the lead flier takes a few steps to the right
- as he curves up the right side and then across the top of the sky, he takes a couple of steps backwards and then walks left across the back of all of the other pilots
- then when he passes the last pilot (and as he curves his kite to fly down the left side, he walks forward
- now in good winds this is just a fun and crownd pleasing move and the pilot would simply join on the back of the team, standing on the ground to the left of the last pilot
- in light winds though, on the leg where you curve down the left side and walk forward, you really float the kite and walk a long way forward, making some ground
- finally once you finish your forward movement and curve across the bottom of the window, the lead flier walks right on the ground to where they began (in terms of left/right position)

The most important thing with this is don't rush it and for the pilots following the lead flier, to ensure that they walk all the way out to the right to the position where the lead flier was, before they curve their kite up or walk back. This makes the move very comfortable and work very well.

If required, you can continue this move ad infinitum going round and round. it's up to you

Hope that makes sense.

Thanks,

Mark

#9 Kitelife

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 10:50 AM

Truth be told, I'm already familiar with the move from my dual line team days, but wanted it explained for posterity.

And since you mentioned it, well... ;)

Thanks for that.

John Barresi

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(found in a fortune cookie - possibly an Einstein quote)

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#10 Stephen Hoath

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 11:19 AM

Truth be told, I'm already familiar with the move from my dual line team days, but wanted it explained for posterity.

And since you mentioned it, well... ;)

Thanks for that.


I couldn't have explained that better if I tried (which I didn't :P )

The Flying Squad also used the technique described by John. For those budding team flyers out there, the most important thing about gaining ground in light winds is that it is a TEAM move. It is not use if the best flyer (usualy me ;) ) makes a great deal of forward ground if the the rest of the team can only make half that.

So the best advice is to take foward ground where you can (it may not always be in the same bit of the move for every flier) and if one goes back, try and stay within 10m's or so. This makes gaining ground easier. Also, if you really do have to scratch the demo, you are all together and not one lone flier who gets all the blame and feels bad. This generally looks more professional as you can end wtih some dignity :rolleyes:

Stephen Hoath

 

 

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#11 Neil

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 01:35 AM

Some great info here - thanks guys.




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