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#21 Mike

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Posted 25 April 2007 - 06:08 AM

Propeller?
Prop?

No need to call direction (clockwise/ anti-clockwise) since all kites fly forward. Just need distance, 90, 180, etc.
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#22 Kitelife

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Posted 25 April 2007 - 06:16 AM

There is no name needed for that move, because the leader sets up the kite positions!

Vertical line facing right, back three face left, pinwheel clockwise 90!

Still a pinwheel, dictated by the flier positions.

Hoath or Lummas, comments?

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#23 Stephen Hoath

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Posted 26 April 2007 - 11:33 AM

But, to clear up some confusion on my part, is what's shown in the manual (with 3 of the 6 moving in reverse) still classed as a pinwheel move? I'd felt (perhaps wrongly!) that a pinwheel always had half the kites facing 180 degrees apart from the other half, with all moving forward.

:)



Dave, we describe any move that rotates around the centre of the shape as a "pin wheel". Thus it is possible to "pin wheel" a box, a Mercedes sign etc etc.

Yes you are right having everyone fly forward is a good way of easing in the new guys (sorry, you got thrown in the deep end!) The alternative is to have everyone facing the same way with the kites in the top half reversing towards the bottom of the group. This, of course, sends the others flying towards the leading edge. In this way you can repeat the move clockwise and ANTIclock wise without the need to turn any kites.

Here endeth todays sermon :P

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#24 antman

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Posted 26 April 2007 - 12:34 PM

john on the pinwheel part im glad to know that because im still rusty on upword reverse flights
GOD PUT ME HERE. TO ENJOY THE WINDS

#25 Mike

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Posted 26 April 2007 - 01:08 PM

Dave, we describe any move that rotates around the centre of the shape as a "pin wheel". Thus it is possible to "pin wheel" a box, a Mercedes sign etc etc.


I kind of like calling any move where your rotate around the center a "twist" since it twists the group's lines. Could even call for "one twist" to move one position, or 3 twists to move 3 positions. Eg. in a 4 kite box, moving from the lower right to the upper left would be a 2 twist. (would have to call clockwise or what not too).

What do other teams call this move?

There is no name needed for that move, because the leader sets up the kite positions!

True, but it might make for an easier shorthand when discussing a routine. It's a matter of striking a balance between too much vocabulary to learn vs long explanations of a common routine. I'm not arguing for either way here, just pointing it out.
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#26 lummas

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Posted 26 April 2007 - 01:35 PM

Thanks for that Stephen, you beat me too it and saved me having to explain the pinwheel concept. As you say though, any shape rotated around its centre is still called a pinwheel by us too. Makes it quick and easy to call moves as you think of them, in whatever shape you end up.

Thanks,

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#27 monkey

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Posted 26 April 2007 - 10:31 PM

right on, thanks for the clarification on that, my confusion thus endeth :lol:

(john you were right ;) )
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#28 Kitelife

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Posted 26 April 2007 - 10:33 PM

Nyah nyah. :P ;)

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#29 Stephen Hoath

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 03:47 AM

What do other teams call this move?
True, but it might make for an easier shorthand when discussing a routine. It's a matter of striking a balance between too much vocabulary to learn vs long explanations of a common routine. I'm not arguing for either way here, just pointing it out.
[/quote]

I think it is important to remember in all these discussions that we are talking about situations where people get together as-hoc. At those times it is helpful to have some basic terminology that all can agree on.

However, for those of you who can get together more frequently, you will quickly develop your own short hand, move names and style of calling. This is not a case of one size fits all.

I am very fortunate and have had the opportunity with flying with a lot of different teams over the years. Each time I learn something new or find a better way of calling an old move. What I am already getting from this forum is some new ideas and a fresh perspective.

The best lesson I have learnt when flying with a new group or new pilots is to keep it simple and repeat a few basic moves until they are second nature. The crowds love it and will watch for hours and the fliers are building up team time which is money in the bank for when you try more unusual/complicated moves next.

Keep 'em coming

Stephen Hoath

 

 

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