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Shockwave in Light Winds


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#1 knolee

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 10:11 AM

I'm a newbie to Rev's. I can fly them and do most of the moves, but my issue seems to be that my shockwave is just dying on me in the lighter winds (~8mph). I'll be sweeping it across the window and it will begin to coast under its own power, leaving me out of control just waiting for the wind to recatch it and let me take over again. Is this something I can correct in my hands? Or should I just wait on mother nature?

#2 FortFlyer

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 10:43 AM

I'm a newbie to Rev's. I can fly them and do most of the moves, but my issue seems to be that my shockwave is just dying on me in the lighter winds (~8mph). I'll be sweeping it across the window and it will begin to coast under its own power, leaving me out of control just waiting for the wind to recatch it and let me take over again. Is this something I can correct in my hands? Or should I just wait on mother nature?


The shockwave is a tough kite to get used to It doesn't like large moves and will side slide out easy on you (sounds like whats happening)

Smaller inputs and keep your hands locked close together can't really flail around until you get really used to it and even then it doesn't like it.

Keep at it after mastering the shockwave all other rev's seem like childs play ;)
Jim,
Ft. Taber Park & Brenton Point

Rev's are like a carbon framed out-of-body experience

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#3 knolee

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 10:52 AM

Thanks. I started on a friends blast and I liked that because it was very smooth, then I also tried to sonic. That was a handful...very twitchy, but fun. I wanted something in between so I got the shockwave. I might be a bit rusty also, I havent flown for about two months and I've only flown my powerkite since then...

#4 Felix Mottram

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 12:24 PM

The shockwave is a tough kite to get used to It doesn't like large moves and will side slide out easy on you (sounds like whats happening)

Smaller inputs and keep your hands locked close together can't really flail around until you get really used to it and even then it doesn't like it.

Keep at it after mastering the shockwave all other rev's seem like childs play ;)


Hi Jim,

I have to take issue with your observations as I found that 'long input' as opposed to 'hands locked close together' was the way to get to grips with the sideways 'slipperyness' of the speed series kites. <grins>

However, I completely agree with your statement suggesting that if you can master the Shockwave the other Revs seem like childs play....

I just love it when the Shockwave goes into (or is pulled into) a 'line slack' glide and you wait to anticipate the 'perfect moment' to pull in the slack and take control again!

Felix

#5 knolee

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 02:35 PM

Felix, it doesn't bother you when that happens? Maybe you're doing it purposely, but it kind of annoys me.
Does this happen because of the flatter plane of the kite that the 2nd spars make?

#6 Felix Mottram

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 10:57 PM

Felix, it doesn't bother you when that happens? Maybe you're doing it purposely, but it kind of annoys me.
Does this happen because of the flatter plane of the kite that the 2nd spars make?


I do not go in for slack line tricks as such but catching thermals and gliding out is cool!

The flatter plane of the kite seems to lend itself to the glide. Weight distribution will play a part as well, I am sure.

Felix

#7 Baloo

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 11:06 PM

And of course the lower the wind you are playing in, the more the Shockwave is going to tease you. It likes high wind and is a bit of a Speed Freak. Of course it will fly in lower winds.

However I find it difficult flying the larger sails in low winds, the Shockwave would just do my head in.

The speed series are good fun though, and I agree about the bigger ones being easier if you can master the quick little devils. Bit the same with a Rev 2, after that my Rev 1 is like a Battleship compared to a Jet Ski.

Best of luck.

#8 FortFlyer

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 12:04 AM

Hi Jim,

I have to take issue with your observations as I found that 'long input' as opposed to 'hands locked close together' was the way to get to grips with the sideways 'slipperyness' of the speed series kites. <grins>

I just love it when the Shockwave goes into (or is pulled into) a 'line slack' glide and you wait to anticipate the 'perfect moment' to pull in the slack and take control again!

Felix


I think the long input works better with an experienced flyer, After learning how the Shockwave works (somehow way different than the supersonic) I was able to long arm and flail about pretty easily now it seems like second nature.

Just my experience with beginners the small inputs almost indoor like (shockwave only) seem to produce better results and build confidence faster. I tend to take for granted sometimes that I picked up rev's fairly easy and thats not always the case for some which can sometimes leave me impatient :blushing: But being the curious chap that I am next time I instruct someone on the speed series now I have to see if long inputs help them (may depend on the person)

To this day it boggles my mind how different the shockwave and the supersonic handle when they seem identical except for a extra few extra cm's of material all the way around the sail yet they react so much different.

As far as the Slack glides well there is no debate about that although I will say the newer Vented Blast with race rods is now my favorite for that even more so than the Power Blast 2-4, But that's another kite for another time B)

knolee I can tell you this I loved the supersonic and especially the vented supersonic so much I went and got a shockwave, At first I hated it and it sat in my bag for over a year and I almost sold it a few times 1 day I decided to take it out and flew it every day for a month determined to master it. Now I'd love to see someone attempt to take it away from me :angry:

It is the toughest Rev to fly but also the most rewarding like I said previously the rest will seem like child's play after this one.

Good Luck and keep at it.
Jim,
Ft. Taber Park & Brenton Point

Rev's are like a carbon framed out-of-body experience

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#9 Felix Mottram

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 02:33 AM

It is the toughest Rev to fly but also the most rewarding like I said previously the rest will seem like child's play after this one.


It is certainly a challenge in light winds <grins>

Felix

#10 knolee

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 06:35 AM

If I had to choose a light wind Rev, and not the zen, what kite would you guys recommend?

What is 'long input'?

#11 Felix Mottram

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 07:01 AM

If I had to choose a light wind Rev, and not the zen, what kite would you guys recommend?

What is 'long input'?


The 1.5B with 3 wrap spars is a good starting point IMHO!

I would interpret 'long input' as using emphatic arm/body movements to increase or decrease the effective wind speed over either or both sail elements. Precise turns and/or speed control are the objective. The same movements are effective across a wide wind speed range subject to appropriate 'brake' settings.

Felix

#12 Watty

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 08:46 AM

... almost indoor like ...


:huh: :blink: uhm...?

If I had to choose a light wind Rev, and not the zen, what kite would you guys recommend?

What is 'long input'?


Well, it sort of depends on your opinion of light wind... For street kiting, and anything under 5mph, I use a full-sail B-Series with race rods, but I have gotten away doing the same with 3-wrap.

Long inputs, I think, are a very effective light-wind technique. Using your entire arm-length to give power to the kite as opposed to just pulling back to your chest. Things like the "samurai slide" (a near flat and slow glide) are achieved by spreading your arms far apart in light to no winds.

Spence "Watty" Watson

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#13 Felix Mottram

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 09:10 AM

<snip>
Long inputs, I think, are a very effective light-wind technique. Using your entire arm-length to give power to the kite as opposed to just pulling back to your chest. Things like the "samurai slide" (a near flat and slow glide) are achieved by spreading your arms far apart in light to no winds.

In higher winds, conversely, being able to 'slow' the effective wind speed by throwing the full arms length from back to front can be very useful especially in conjunction with moving on the ground at the same time!

Felix




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