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#1 Mitch

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Posted 21 August 2009 - 01:18 PM

I just bought my first Rev. I get a RevII, attracted to hits small pack-up size for travel. But now i read it's "twitchy". I tried flying it once in unusually high winds for this area (St. Louis, MO, USA). Not much luck. Is the Rev 2 a reasonable machine to learn on? I don't want to so frustrate myself that I dampen my current burning enthusiasm to learn this kind of aerial control. :) Should I get a larger model to start with, or is the Rev 2 just need a little more patience in this area of generally light winds.

Mitch
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#2 Jeff

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Posted 21 August 2009 - 01:27 PM

Hi Mitch.

In all honesty, I wouldn't recommend learning on a Rev II. Well, it's not that you can't but I do think it will be harder to learn on the II than the 1.5 or a 1.

Flying a Rev is better than not flying a Rev, though. So don't take it to mean that I don't think you should try or that you can't. But if you had the means to get a 1.5 (in any of its varieties) I would do it.

If you are plagued with light winds, you want a larger sail, too. It will be that much more difficult with the II.

I love all the Revs, but I think you'd have a more enjoyable time with a larger version to start.
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#3 tpetrick

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Posted 21 August 2009 - 08:15 PM

My first "real" sport kite was a RevII in the early nineties. It was also the only sport kite that I had for a year or two. The biggest problem I had when trying to learn was finding enough wind. I remember that the first time I was able to get out when there was enough wind it was like a light being switched on. All of the sudden I was able to fly the kite. Before that it seemed like all I did was untangle Kevlar lines (anyone remember Kevlar).

I am in Omaha and probably have the same lousy winds here that you do in St Louis. Last year I got a vented B-series and won a 1.5 in a raffle on this forum. With the new additions I am able to fly a Rev on most days.

I will say that my Rev II is still the kite that gets the most time in the sky. Seems like it always brings a smile whenever I get it out. I tend to fly it on shorter lines and in heavier winds than my other kites.

All of that being said, if you are trying to get more time in the sky I wonder if a race frame might be a good option. I have a race frame for my B vented and cannot believe how low of winds it flys in. If you are limited to the one kite the race frame might be a good option, if you can afford another kite the 1.5's are probably a little easier to learn on.

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#4 Mitch

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Posted 22 August 2009 - 12:44 AM

My first "real" sport kite was a RevII in the early nineties. It was also the only sport kite that I had for a year or two. The biggest problem I had when trying to learn was finding enough wind. I remember that the first time I was able to get out when there was enough wind it was like a light being switched on. All of the sudden I was able to fly the kite. Before that it seemed like all I did was untangle Kevlar lines (anyone remember Kevlar).

I am in Omaha and probably have the same lousy winds here that you do in St Louis. Last year I got a vented B-series and won a 1.5 in a raffle on this forum. With the new additions I am able to fly a Rev on most days.

I will say that my Rev II is still the kite that gets the most time in the sky. Seems like it always brings a smile whenever I get it out. I tend to fly it on shorter lines and in heavier winds than my other kites.

All of that being said, if you are trying to get more time in the sky I wonder if a race frame might be a good option. I have a race frame for my B vented and cannot believe how low of winds it flys in. If you are limited to the one kite the race frame might be a good option, if you can afford another kite the 1.5's are probably a little easier to learn on.

Todd



Good tip. Maybe I'll pick up a bigger sail and keep the RevII as a treat, once I've got some flight time under my belt. I'll have to read up about what a race frame actually is, of course, but the discovery is one of the joys of being a complete novice. Thanks.
Mitch

#5 RevWizard

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Posted 22 August 2009 - 10:42 AM

I just bought my first Rev. I get a RevII, attracted to hits small pack-up size for travel. But now i read it's "twitchy". I tried flying it once in unusually high winds for this area (St. Louis, MO, USA). Not much luck. Is the Rev 2 a reasonable machine to learn on? I don't want to so frustrate myself that I dampen my current burning enthusiasm to learn this kind of aerial control. :) Should I get a larger model to start with, or is the Rev 2 just need a little more patience in this area of generally light winds.

Mitch

I taught one young boy how to fly for the first time on a REV II. He picked it up within 10 minutes. I didn't get me REV II back for at least and hour. He was quite good. I never saw him again.

Almost the same with my daughter when she was in her early teens. She learned to fly a REV for the first time being the REV II in about ten minutes. She flew it for about 30 minutes and landed it. She accomplished what she set out to do and never flew again to my knowledge. Her interests are obviously elsewhere.

I would say the REV II is fine for the young ones to learn on. Reactions slow as you get older. The REV 1.5 is all around the best at this time. The REV I had this problem of flipping the wing tips when over controlled. Thus not so good to learn on. I do believe ZEN will be the better training REV due to center being larger.

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#6 Jeff

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Posted 22 August 2009 - 11:25 AM

The REV I had this problem of flipping the wing tips when over controlled. Thus not so good to learn on.

See now, I guess this is why it's different for everyone, and you don't know 'til you try. I learned on a Rev I and thought it was great!
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#7 Dean750

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Posted 23 August 2009 - 11:19 AM

Rev 1 is what I started on.
Yes the tips flip when over controlled.
Has anyone mentioned anything about tuning? :wacko:
Got my 13 year old son up flying entirly on his own now.
How you might ask?
So much forward that you couldn't over control it, but it would still turn and stop. Let the top lines out after a few minutes to gradually shrink the inputs needed to produce a result.
Where theres a will there is a way ;)

Dean

#8 Mitch

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Posted 24 August 2009 - 09:50 PM

Rev 1 is what I started on.
Yes the tips flip when over controlled.
Has anyone mentioned anything about tuning? :wacko:
Got my 13 year old son up flying entirly on his own now.
How you might ask?
So much forward that you couldn't over control it, but it would still turn and stop. Let the top lines out after a few minutes to gradually shrink the inputs needed to produce a result.
Where theres a will there is a way ;)

Dean



Do you think this would work on the Rev II? Who much would you take in on the top lines?
Mitch

#9 steveb

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Posted 24 August 2009 - 11:31 PM

I learned the very basics on a Rev I in '91 or '92, but it was the Rev II that I spent most of my flying time on.

I love the Vented Rev II and with some practise, it will fly in remarkably light winds:
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#10 kiteslinger

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Posted 25 August 2009 - 04:34 PM

that's about all I ever fly now are rev 2s and I taught my wife to fly using a rev 2

#11 REVflyer

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Posted 26 August 2009 - 03:10 AM

my first REV was a backtracker,
I thought I'd gone to heaven when I picked a couple of beat-up old REV2 demo kites from the KiteLoft.
I swapped in the sails for new ones (Lolly used to allow a trade-in policy, not sure if that program is still offered)

I negotiated a private quad-line lesson from Jeff Burka in about 1995.
(Long throw handles influence and without any bridle, he's a rev2 PhD for sure!)

I joined the local kite club and learned how to sew around '97.
I have been buying and flying Revs ever since. Making a kite is NOT cheaper than buying one!

You want to talk about a tough kite to learn on,... try a Backtracker.
The newbies are so lucky now. I spent two years learning what a small child picks-up in the first 10 minutes nowadays!

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#12 lylenc

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 09:17 AM

I learned to fly quad on a Rev II with no video or other flyers to help. I used it as my high wind kite, before I got smart and flew it in lighter wind, which made learning easier. Controlled inverted hover and slide were just out of my reach (over-control), until I bought a 1.5 and got a couple of tips at a festival.

Best tip given was to pick a spot in the sky, such as cloud or tree top, and do super slow rotations around the center while holding the center in that one spot. Also, do inverted hover launch about a foot and hold steady with leading edge parallel to the ground. That way the kite can't accelerate much before crashing. Those two exercises taught small inputs for fine tune control. I had inverted control within a half hour after those tips.
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#13 Kitelife

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 04:20 PM

The Rev II is a real hoot... I like it on 50# lines, original Rev I handles (10"?), race frame and a fair bit of brake.

Like a little scalpel at the end of the lines, but quick. :D

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#14 Stone in Shoe Bob

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Posted 29 November 2009 - 01:39 AM

The Rev II is a real hoot... I like it on 50# lines, original Rev I handles (10"?), race frame and a fair bit of brake.

Like a little scalpel at the end of the lines, but quick. :D

I'm with you on that one John.

I bought mine used and it came kite only so I didn't have Rev II handles so I had to use what I had, as for lines I had a few 85" line sets that had cone in 1.5 RTF packages I split a spare set with a mate and made 2 x 42" sets, I have another set I am planning on splitting, 30, 50, I like the idea of going even shorter.

Spelling and punctuation.

Edited by Stone in Shoe Bob, 29 November 2009 - 01:42 AM.

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#15 Kitelife

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Posted 29 November 2009 - 10:17 AM

I should clarify however, while I like it, I also wouldn't recommend the Rev II for a beginner...

Anything in the 1.5 class (EXP through B) will do you right, more feeling and control in the larger kite.

John Barresi

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#16 John F

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Posted 29 November 2009 - 10:56 PM

I should clarify however, while I like it, I also wouldn't recommend the Rev II for a beginner...

Anything in the 1.5 class (EXP through B) will do you right, more feeling and control in the larger kite.


I agree. My first REV was REV 2. It took me several sessions to learn basic control. It was so fast and it required 5 to 6 mph winds to get decent lift. Did learn and it was fun. When I did get a 1.5 that seemed like a snap. Also taught my wife and a couple other people to fly on 1.5's. Took them about 20 minutes or less to get to the basic control level. I would start on a non vented 1.5 with race rods and go out on a day with 5 or 6 mph winds. That is ideal for learning IMHO.

John

PS now using REV 2 with Race rods indoors. Now that is a hoot.

#17 Stone in Shoe Bob

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Posted 30 November 2009 - 11:14 AM

Yes we were getting a bit "off topic" there.

Sorry.
Stone in Shoe Bob

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#18 Reef Runner

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 07:26 AM

Just to throw in my two cents, and I'm surely no pro, but an old fellow kiter, told me years ago, to always remember, whether it's single line Deltas, dual line Stunt Kites, or quad line Revs, "The larger the kite, the slower it moves, and the easier it is to fly", and to control. Never fool yourself into thinking, that the cute "little kite", over there in the corner of the kite store, will be a good one for me to learn on. "N-O-T". Needless to say, I have always found this to be true, and if you don't believe it, go grab a "Prism Micron" Stunt Kite (excuse the dual line reference here) , and give it a whirl in 10 - 12 mph winds. Once you get the Micron under control (if you ever do), then go and pick up a full size (92" - 96" inch) dual line Stunt Kite, and you'll think you are flying in slow motion. Kind of like, molasses in January. I would think that this same, "rule of thumb", holds true for Revs, and from what I've read, obviously so. Being somewhat new to the Rev scene, I've got a Rev I, and several 1.5's, and so far, I can surely see the difference in those two. Currently, I'm working myself up to a Rev II (maybe next year), because I do enjoy cruising on the dunes, out at the coast, but I also enjoy the speed. Posted Image

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#19 beach

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 08:31 AM

I think that any of the 1.5 size kites are the best to learn on and then keep that 2 for when you want to just have some fast fun...... BenPosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

#20 Kitelife

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 08:36 AM

I'd tend to agree.

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