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New Rev Owner, Happy...sort of


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#21 JMZ

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Posted 25 October 2009 - 03:58 PM

Denny knows a Bobby who lives and flies in PA.

ohhhhhhhhhh Denny?

#22 Baws

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Posted 26 October 2009 - 08:21 PM

"I have never heard of a dual line flier who had an easy time of it learning to fly a quad. "

I think that my experience as a dual line flier has helped me quite a bit. Also my time flying R/C planes (many years ago) helped me with the inverted flight. I spent about an hour and a half of quality time with Cath showing me the basics, back in September. At this point with about 10 hours of flight time, in some not so favorable wind conditions here in PA. I can do dive stops @ full speed stopping inches from the ground, left and right inverted slides (although not to well), tip stands, clock turns, I've done one good flic Flac, and two good axels. I love flying my EXP and can't wait until I get my B series. I have found that flying Revs has also improved my duel line flying. :)

Edited by Baws, 30 October 2009 - 07:23 AM.


#23 JMZ

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Posted 27 October 2009 - 02:26 AM

...left and right inverted slides...


What's a slide?

#24 HedgeWarden

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 05:04 PM

What's a slide?


Hmmph - since none of the real fliers have answered your very good question, I shall provide a fractured answer that aught to inspire the friendly knowledgeable fliers to provide a better answer...

JMZ, a slide is a movement of the kite sideways. As far as I know, "slides" involve either an upright or an inverted orientation, and a horizontal motion. (Hey you guys, help us here. Is a vertical movement in a 3 or 9 o'clock orientation considered a slide?)

You accomplish a slide by pulling back on one or the other hand, being careful to maintain the kite's orientation. An inverted slide held inches above the ground is quite impressive, as the kite races sideways across the field - and quite beyond my current ability. But, I'm closing in on it bit by bit. :)
-Howard
No, this is my first childhood!

#25 REVflyer

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Posted 30 October 2009 - 03:17 AM

Hmmph - since none of the real fliers have answered your very good question, I shall provide a fractured answer that aught to inspire the friendly knowledgeable fliers to provide a better answer...

JMZ, a slide is a movement of the kite sideways. As far as I know, "slides" involve either an upright or an inverted orientation, and a horizontal motion. (Hey you guys, help us here. Is a vertical movement in a 3 or 9 o'clock orientation considered a slide?)

You accomplish a slide by pulling back on one or the other hand, being careful to maintain the kite's orientation. An inverted slide held inches above the ground is quite impressive, as the kite races sideways across the field - and quite beyond my current ability. But, I'm closing in on it bit by bit. :)



Here's a trick to make learning the inverted slide motion easier.
An inverted side slide looks better than an upright one, right?,... particularly when done inches above the ground. It's also tougher to get the hang of because everything is backwards! As described above, the action is done by effectively changing the relationship between the two handles. When we first learn to fly it's by keeping your handles close together and rotating the handles together or individually, either pushing your thumb forward or rotating the handle towards your body. For a slide though, one of the handles is pulled back (NOT a thumb rotation!) and the other handle is pushed forward (no rotation on this handle either, except for tiny adjustments necessary relating to the wind conditions),... all the while holding the kite in the same orientation as far as the leading edge is concerned.

Okay to side-slide inverted, you will have the kite resting on the ground or at least hovering above it and completely stationary inverted. In this example we are sliding from left to the right side of the wind window. You need to take the top of the handle in your left hand. Rotate it so that the brake part/bottom is pointing away from your body and then stick the top leader end directly into your rib cage, (ignore it now and use only the other hand to effect the slide speed and for all altitude controls) Nothing is confusing because you are only thinking about one action.

Gradually pull the right hand further and further back as the kite goes across the wind window. After grasping the principles you don't need to use the rib-cage-stab technique any more. Practice aggressively starting and stopping the action, in little bursts back and forth, pasting the kite stationary in between each action. Notice that the handle you're pulling back is the direction of flight when sliding.

Naturally you can slide up and down with the leading edge pointed directly away from you as well and vertical. (I would still refer to this direction as a slide)

Imagine you are flying on the outside edge of a sphere instead of on a box. At the top of the window one handle will be stuck almost into your armpit and the other hand will be as far away from your torso as possible (like an archer would look before releasing the arrow). As the kite flies down (on the outside of the sphere towards you) your bottom handle will come back towards your waist and the armpit gripped one will also gradually return back to neutral in front of you. Again practice this action, depending on the wind conditions you may need to walk forward or backwards to keep it smoother in flight. Done aggressively this makes a tip stab. Practice flipping it 180 degrees and freezing it in position between.

Now when you practice the upright side slide everything is easy, you already understand the action that is necessary and nothing is reversed or confusing anymore. And YES you can slide diagonally too, but that is very tough to look effortless!

At the very edge of the inverted side slide window is a great spot to throw your first axel! Practice that and heck you're on your way to assembling a great looking routine for your next demo!

Edited by REVflyer, 30 October 2009 - 03:20 AM.





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