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Making my First Linesets


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#1 kairusan

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 11:16 PM

I picked up some Warp Speed line at AWOC recently and have just used some of it to make up my first linesets: a 90lbx120ft set and a 150lbx120ft set. After measuring, sleeving, and all of that, it came time to stretch and equalize the sets, and I'm wondering if one or more of you expert linemakers out there can offer comments on whether I did that last part correctly. And if I did not, perhaps you could let me know how to rectify my horrible mistake(s)?

To stretch and equalize my lines, I finished out one end of each of the four lines and larks-headed the lot of them to a sturdy point about 6 feet up off the ground. I then ran the lines all the way out, wrapped the loose ends round a smooth stake a few times, and pulled gently but firmly until the lines would no longer expand, then let off tension and repeated a couple times more. I then unwound the loose ends from the stake, grasped them all together and with both hands sort of made a "milking" motion, if you will, along the lines until there appeared to be no "drooping" whatsoever along the length of the lines to the larks-head point. Once all four lines seemed equally taut, I marked a line across all four at once, just above where I was holding them in my hand. Used that as a reference point for tying the knots on those ends and finished them up accordingly, taking great care to make all the loops exactly the same length.

Now, can I expect these things to be reasonably equalized when I finally get out to test-fly them? Or did I do it all wrong? And if they're all screwed up, how can I tell? These lines are SO long it's hard to just eyeball it as I do when equalizing shorter sets, like my 25 foot set which was a total breeze.

Thanks! :wub:
kairusan

#2 Simon

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 12:14 AM

I picked up some Warp Speed line at AWOC recently and have just used some of it to make up my first linesets: a 90lbx120ft set and a 150lbx120ft set. After measuring, sleeving, and all of that, it came time to stretch and equalize the sets, and I'm wondering if one or more of you expert linemakers out there can offer comments on whether I did that last part correctly. And if I did not, perhaps you could let me know how to rectify my horrible mistake(s)?

To stretch and equalize my lines, I finished out one end of each of the four lines and larks-headed the lot of them to a sturdy point about 6 feet up off the ground. I then ran the lines all the way out, wrapped the loose ends round a smooth stake a few times, and pulled gently but firmly until the lines would no longer expand, then let off tension and repeated a couple times more. I then unwound the loose ends from the stake, grasped them all together and with both hands sort of made a "milking" motion, if you will, along the lines until there appeared to be no "drooping" whatsoever along the length of the lines to the larks-head point. Once all four lines seemed equally taut, I marked a line across all four at once, just above where I was holding them in my hand. Used that as a reference point for tying the knots on those ends and finished them up accordingly, taking great care to make all the loops exactly the same length.

Now, can I expect these things to be reasonably equalized when I finally get out to test-fly them? Or did I do it all wrong? And if they're all screwed up, how can I tell? These lines are SO long it's hard to just eyeball it as I do when equalizing shorter sets, like my 25 foot set which was a total breeze.

Thanks! :wub:


Hi I too was doing that yesterday and did pretty much the same.

But I let them rest on the ground once pulled out, so the weight of the line doesnt coem into play.

Also make sure all sleeving is the same length. Drawa line on the line set, moving sleeving to line, tie a knot DONE

I also double knot one end and only adjust from one end with a single knot in it.

Check every couple of flys for the next week or so and switch top and bottom.

The Flying Squad

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#3 bobw

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 03:41 AM

I picked up some Warp Speed line at AWOC recently and have just used some of it to make up my first linesets: a 90lbx120ft set and a 150lbx120ft set. After measuring, sleeving, and all of that, it came time to stretch and equalize the sets, and I'm wondering if one or more of you expert linemakers out there can offer comments on whether I did that last part correctly. And if I did not, perhaps you could let me know how to rectify my horrible mistake(s)?

To stretch and equalize my lines, I finished out one end of each of the four lines and larks-headed the lot of them to a sturdy point about 6 feet up off the ground. I then ran the lines all the way out, wrapped the loose ends round a smooth stake a few times, and pulled gently but firmly until the lines would no longer expand, then let off tension and repeated a couple times more. I then unwound the loose ends from the stake, grasped them all together and with both hands sort of made a "milking" motion, if you will, along the lines until there appeared to be no "drooping" whatsoever along the length of the lines to the larks-head point. Once all four lines seemed equally taut, I marked a line across all four at once, just above where I was holding them in my hand. Used that as a reference point for tying the knots on those ends and finished them up accordingly, taking great care to make all the loops exactly the same length.

Now, can I expect these things to be reasonably equalized when I finally get out to test-fly them? Or did I do it all wrong? And if they're all screwed up, how can I tell? These lines are SO long it's hard to just eyeball it as I do when equalizing shorter sets, like my 25 foot set which was a total breeze.

Thanks! :wub:

I used the droop test. After all that you did, just let a little slack into the lines on a still day, and adjust the lines until they sag the same amt. Seems to have worked. That, along with the steps you took, and alternating tops and bottoms seems to have worked so far.

#4 REVflyer

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 03:45 AM

hook your new lines onto the flying handles, drop each flying line onto a well-set stake and pull back tight.
See if both handles align perfectly

If not, make minor adjustments until they do!

#5 kairusan

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 09:58 AM

hook your new lines onto the flying handles, drop each flying line onto a well-set stake and pull back tight.
See if both handles align perfectly

If not, make minor adjustments until they do!


Now THAT'S a great idea! Merci! :ninja:
kairusan

#6 Wobbly

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 11:21 AM

Been flying for a while now but only found this out recently ( thanks Harrier ) a lot of plastic line winder's have a hole in the middle large enough for a finger and a little notch on either side, put finger in hole and a line from each pair onto the notch and tension, winder act's like a balance beam, adjust line length then repeat with the other pair, using this as part of my setting up routine on the field, very quick and easy, just goes to prove you are never too old to learn and as Gran used to say "a Day's never wasted if you learn something usefull".

#7 Baloo

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 12:11 PM

You can make your own line equaliser if you dont have one on your line winder.

All you need is a centre balance point, and 2 equal points for the line loop to slip over.

Actually for equalising 2 lines, you just have to go through the process a few times if you have 4 lines. Equalise the 3 to one if that makes sense.

A good way to check if your lines are equal is to fly your kite with them, if the kite acts crazy and wont do anything you want then that means the lines are not right. I never equalise my lines, then I can blame them for my RUBBISH flying. :sq_wink: :rolleyes:

A proper instead of silly way to check, hold your handles together so they are equal. Take off gently, if the kite rises straight to the top of the window, all is perfect. If it rolls off one way or another you need to adjust. to adjust small amounts add an overhand knot rather than undoing the leaders on the flying field. Once you have a few, undo them all and re-do the leaders.

To be honest, you have to be JB to feel a difference. If you want your lines perfect, give them to him and ask him to equalise them. Most of us mere mortals wont feel a bit of a difference.

I think it was the wise Scot Fraser, bless his little cotton socks. That said, he always knows when his lines need equalising when he has to ask the guy stood behind him to hold one handle so he can control his Rev right.

#8 manny

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 04:17 PM

I like the "milking motion" Got any results? :blink:

#9 kairusan

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 06:21 PM

I like the "milking motion" Got any results? :blink:


I happen to like "milking motions" as well. And I'm happy to report that they resulted in at least one of my two 120' sets being exactly spot-on equalized first time! I got a chance to fly on the 90lb set for a bit today and it was not only perfectly balanced in feel but really awesome; the kite is so much easier to control and the window is positively ginormous.

Too bad the winds were terrible. Oh well! :sq_sick:
kairusan

#10 manny

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 10:09 PM

I happen to like "milking motions" as well. And I'm happy to report that they resulted in at least one of my two 120' sets being exactly spot-on equalized first time! I got a chance to fly on the 90lb set for a bit today and it was not only perfectly balanced in feel but really awesome; the kite is so much easier to control and the window is positively ginormous.

Too bad the winds were terrible. Oh well! :sq_sick:


Congratulations. Whenever I ever "milked" something they were kind of uneven :wub:
I made few lineset before and they usually needed some adjusting after a flight or two. After all its no big deal to adjust them and it saves so much money when you make your own




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