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#1 pitviper51

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 11:46 AM

Hi,
Well i made the jump and was able to find a used 1.5 vented here on the forum ( thanks you know who you are :) .). knowing what i do at this point about revs (little..) would it be safe to say if i got the normal 90x 90# lines and a set of 50x50s i would have a large wind range with that rig, it is going to have a 3wrap frame. I am also considering getting a 1.5 SUL to run on those 50x50s as well for even lighter conditions, does this make sence?? thoughts welcome. yep i have been bitten and dont even have a rev yet..
mike

#2 AdventureAng

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 12:15 PM

If you're going to get TWO sets of lines, I'd go for 120 ft. lines so you're prepared when you eventually fly team with other people (120 is the standard length when you're flying team because you get more sky), and then anything from 50 to 90 ft. as your second set of lines. My personal favorite is 25 ft. lines though because they set up really quickly, however you need to respond quicker to things as well so it might not be good for somebody just starting with a rev.
~AdventureAng
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#3 pitviper51

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 12:49 PM

thanks, for flying at the rc field 120s would be great, but for back yard flying i use 100s on my power kite and that still has me standing in the nieghbors yard, much longer and itll be interesting. i was actully thinking 85ft for my normal line for the back yard so i am closer to the kite.. then again i could rig up a few bike hubs as pullys and try that flying in front of my face stuff ( looks so cool!) well im off to hopfully fly a sle 1.5 that a friend has :mf_party:
mike

ps should have more questions when i get back.

#4 Jeepster

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 01:16 PM

Mike,

As Angie says, you'll likely need 120 foot lines for team flying. But, they also have the advantage of giving you a larger wind window and slowing the kite down ... both characteristics are an advantage for learning to fly. Think of a large trainer plane.

Different areas of the country seem to settle on a second, shorter length for small field/team flying. IKE uses 80 foot lines ... Kite Party used 75 foot lines ... Shanti prebuild lines seem to come in 85 foot lengths. Consider 75 to 85 foot for your second set of lines. This length of line set makes the wind window smaller and makes the kite react a little faster. Think of your second or third RC plane ... low winged, tail dragger, 52 inch wing span ... it demands more attention.

Your third set of lines should be in the 35 to 50 foot range. With a reasonable wind, things happen quickly. Think of your low winged, overpowered, unlimited vertical performance plane. You have to pay attention to stay ahead of the kite. The weight and drag savings going to 50# lines is minimal ... buy bulk line in 90# and make your own line sets. I like the 50 foot length, but a 1000 foot of Shanti will yield a 120 foot set, an 80 foot set, and the final one a little short of 50 foot.

Having these three line sets will turn a single kite into three ... that's the cheapest way to expand your kite bag.

Again, these are simply my opinions ... other's will vary!

Cheers,
Tom

#5 Baloo

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 01:17 PM

You just keep asking. If we dont know the answer we will just lie ;-)

Hope you had fun. and thought of loads of new questions.

#6 Jeepster

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 01:20 PM

If we dont know the answer we will just lie ;-)


Don't spoil the fun and fess up so quickly ...

Cheers,
Tom

#7 Baloo

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 01:21 PM

Oh, another point I just though of.

The weight of lines actually makes the kite fly different.

To quote JB, if you go up to 150lb lines it is like going up a rod wrap if that makes sense. Heavier lines slow the kite down a bit.

So if you fly on equal length 50lb after getting used to 90 lb it will liven the kite up.

hope that makes sense, now I have read it back not sure that it does??

#8 Jeepster

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 01:38 PM

hope that makes sense, now I have read it back not sure that it does??


Bear,

The funny thiing with 50# line sets is that it doesn't take much for a newbie to get in trouble ... about 30# of pull will, in theory, break the lines. So, I'd rather see someone learn with 90# line sets.

Once you become really proficient, you can effectively fly with clothsline ... you don't need the 50# lines. I'm constantly amazed when I see Mike Kory flying in low winds with the wrong equipment. I can't get my race rod equipped SUL off the ground and he's flying a standard sail with three wraps and 120 foot 90# lines. Even JB will tell you it's not the equipment as much as the skill set ... that's what he told me early on when I was fussing about equipment.

So, for most flying, 50# line sets are not really needed. Indoors and very short line, low wind outdoor flying would seem to be the best opportunities for 50# lines.

Cheers,
Tom

#9 Jeff

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 02:29 PM

I've never flown with anything but 90# line. I like to keep it simple. ;)
CYuLf.jpg 0LPEo.png and ybuXm.png

#10 Stone in Shoe Bob

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 02:57 PM

I know there will be a lot of people who will disagree with me on this, but if I were you I would just go for the 90 x90 for now. You can only fly one kite at a time so you only need one set of lines. 80 or 90ft is a good length to start out with, go much shorter and the kite will be way too frisky for a newbie.

As for 120’s, that extra large window doesn’t come without cost. If you go too long with the lines you start to introduce inertia into the control and reduce the feed-back you get from the kite.

If you want to fly team you will need 120’s but before you can fly team you need to learn to fly the kite. Also you have to remember that every foot you add to your lines adds two foot (one there and one back) to the walk of shame. Learn to fly your kite and get to know her then start thinking about 120’s and team flying.
Stone in Shoe Bob

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#11 Love2fly

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 07:16 PM

Hi Mike-
Just to add what to what the guys have stated; if I'm not mistaken, many indoor flyers use 90# line; which says a lot right there.
Good luck and have fun.
Laura
 
*** Any day flying is a good day; have a great one! 
**** REVS: Fly it, you'll like it!
***** L.S.P. ... It's worth the trip!
 
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#12 pitviper51

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 07:32 PM

thanks alot folks, i am used to the forum atmosphere as far as many opinions go, on my other sites im one of those 6000 post guys hahah. unfortuneatly i didnt get to fly tonight the wind went to zip when i got there and he didnt have the rev ready due to work schedule, but i think i have it narrowed down and im going to get a 90# set at 90 ft and 50ft,, this is a world of change since i am used to flying 350# lines haha
mike

#13 Mike

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 04:58 AM

In addition, try to find other fliers to fly with. It speeds up the learning curve.
I don't know where in Kentucky you live, but try to make the kite festival formerly known as Airwaves.
It's now called "Otto M. Budig Kite Fest" and it's just north of Cincinnati on April 4-5. A google search will turn up details.
There will be plenty of Rev fliers there you can learn from.
Mike Kory:
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#14 Jim Foster

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 08:10 AM

Lynn and I each carry a set of 75', 100', and 120', all sets are 90# Laser Pro.

75' for when space is limited, 100' for everyday use flying together, and 120' for team flying.
At Kite party we did have 11 fliers in the mega fly on 75' lines, but that gets a little crowded. :huh:

Neither of us are excited about flying in real light wind or indoors, so shorter lines or 50# are not for us.

As far as kites, you will probably end up with an SUL, a standard full sail and a vented. You can get by many times by putting a two wrap frame in your standard sail Rev in light wind. We did that for years before getting our SULs.

In very heavy wind, you can add a two wrap leading edge to the three wrap in your vented kite. This configuration flies very well.

Like Mike says, one of the best things you can do is seek out other Rev fliers. You will learn a lot, and besides, flying with others is just way too much fun.
Fly together! Share the joy, Share the fun

#15 pitviper51

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 02:47 PM

thanks, ill see how it works out, one step at a time, tho a sul would be needed for today,, it was in the 60s yesterday and today its snowing.. ekk...... any one know anythign about airbrushing on a rev??
mike

#16 Baloo

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 11:06 PM

Bear,

The funny thiing with 50# line sets is that it doesn't take much for a newbie to get in trouble ... about 30# of pull will, in theory, break the lines. So, I'd rather see someone learn with 90# line sets.

Once you become really proficient, you can effectively fly with clothsline ... you don't need the 50# lines. I'm constantly amazed when I see Mike Kory flying in low winds with the wrong equipment. I can't get my race rod equipped SUL off the ground and he's flying a standard sail with three wraps and 120 foot 90# lines. Even JB will tell you it's not the equipment as much as the skill set ... that's what he told me early on when I was fussing about equipment.

So, for most flying, 50# line sets are not really needed. Indoors and very short line, low wind outdoor flying would seem to be the best opportunities for 50# lines.

Cheers,
Tom

Sorry Tom (et al), and I do realise an apology is not needed as it added to the discussion anyway, I was'nt trying to suggest that Mike got a 50lb set. I was trying to point out that both the length and weight of lines makes a difference. I personaly would not dream of flying on 50lb lines. I am still a novice. Most of my flying is on 80ft 90ld Laser Pro. If I fancy more exersise (walking) I go for 120's I do have lines all the way up from 30 to 120 though, just to suit my mood. Those 30's realy make you think a couple of mooves ahead of yourself. :lol:

#17 Sailor99

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 12:00 AM

While I agree that there are down sides to 50lbs line, don't discount them. They are stronger than you think and with care and treatment (sewers aid) can be used for team. And they don't half reduce the drag. Tiger woods could beat me at golf with an old piece of hose. So you are right that skill is the key ingredient. But when he is on the PGA circuit I have heard that Tiger uses the very best, top of the range, only just within the rules golf bats. So maybe equipment has a role too ;)
Over - Jeremy

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#18 david ellison

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 01:16 AM

So maybe equipment has a role too ;)

and this from the man who thinks equalising is for wimps! ;)

Another vote here for individual flying with 50lb lines and a 1.5. They can take it and the sense of connection with the kite is much improved.

#19 Sailor99

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 03:05 AM

and this from the man who thinks equalising is for wimps! ;)

Good point well made!!
Over - Jeremy

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#20 Stone in Shoe Bob

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 08:35 AM

While I agree that there are down sides to 50lbs line, don't discount them. They are stronger than you think and with care and treatment (sewers aid) can be used for team. And they don't half reduce the drag. Tiger woods could beat me at golf with an old piece of hose. So you are right that skill is the key ingredient. But when he is on the PGA circuit I have heard that Tiger uses the very best, top of the range, only just within the rules golf bats. So maybe equipment has a role too ;)

It's often said that "a good workman never blames his tools" but that's because a good workman understands the importance of choosing the right equipment and taking care of it.
Stone in Shoe Bob

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