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Dangerous Toys


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#1 Kite Krusader

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 05:14 PM

Just some info on Dangerous Toys.

Attached File  2008ToylandReport.pdf   505.4KB   112 downloads
Attached File  ToyList.pdf   468.04KB   170 downloads
Your friendly neighborhood kite flyer.

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#2 big bri

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 11:36 PM

Just some info on Dangerous Toys.

Attached File  2008ToylandReport.pdf   505.4KB   112 downloads
Attached File  ToyList.pdf   468.04KB   170 downloads



Dont work for me freind

BRIAN...

#3 Kite Krusader

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Posted 01 December 2008 - 04:27 AM

You may have to Refresh the PDF page.
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#4 Martyjuggles

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Posted 01 December 2008 - 05:46 AM

i may be showing my hand here but it seems a bit daft to specifically name and shame products for containing magnets, balloons, being pointy or lengths of string since numerous toys and household items (including things i regularly let my kids play with) have these features. Saying children shouldn't play with balloons or string potentially robs them of the simple pleasures of childhood.

My kids are 5 and 3 and i actively encourage them to play with string, fire, sharp stuff, hot things, magnets, balloons and to climb to height because they help children to risk assess for themselves, they do this with graduated support and observation from myself and my wife.

While i think that reports of this nature are useful and informative, without appropriate context they encourage a culture of fear and for parents to remove risk from children's lives completely. This is VERY dangerous in my opinion.

Did you know that a recent study of hospital admissions in the UK showed a significant decrease in admissions for children falling out of trees with almost TWICE AS MANY children being injured from falling off beds!!! In the same year there was a 35% increase in repetitive strain injuries attributed to computer games.

Personally i would rather my children risk a minor burn, bruise scratch or graze than grow up with a sanitized, sterile childhood. . . . my best memories of childhood were when i was pushing my own mental and physical boundaries to the point of being scared . . . .

rant over

:blushing:
Thinking about a stack . . .

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#5 bartman

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Posted 01 December 2008 - 07:04 AM

i may be showing my hand here but it seems a bit daft to specifically name and shame products for containing magnets, balloons, being pointy or lengths of string since numerous toys and household items (including things i regularly let my kids play with) have these features. Saying children shouldn't play with balloons or string potentially robs them of the simple pleasures of childhood.

My kids are 5 and 3 and i actively encourage them to play with string, fire, sharp stuff, hot things, magnets, balloons and to climb to height because they help children to risk assess for themselves, they do this with graduated support and observation from myself and my wife.

While i think that reports of this nature are useful and informative, without appropriate context they encourage a culture of fear and for parents to remove risk from children's lives completely. This is VERY dangerous in my opinion.

Did you know that a recent study of hospital admissions in the UK showed a significant decrease in admissions for children falling out of trees with almost TWICE AS MANY children being injured from falling off beds!!! In the same year there was a 35% increase in repetitive strain injuries attributed to computer games.

Personally i would rather my children risk a minor burn, bruise scratch or graze than grow up with a sanitized, sterile childhood. . . . my best memories of childhood were when i was pushing my own mental and physical boundaries to the point of being scared . . . .

rant over

:blushing:


I don't have kids so you can dismiss this if you want as just another guy who has no clue about parenting, but I'm going to say it anyway.

I have no idea how I got through my childhood, or really how any of my friends did. We regularily played with things and around things that should have killed us by today's standards. It was not unusual to tunnel through snow banks, climb trees, play around water, light fire crackers, shoot bottles and dozens of other things that probably should have killed us. I guess kids were tougher back then.

I know so many parents who fuss over their kids that it drives me crazy. They fall down, they pick them back up. They scrape their hand and it's off to the hospital. One friend's kid had rode to the hospital, in an ambulance, no less than 4 times by the time he was 4 and none of those times were life threatening. I've also seen the results when these kids get older and it is anything but good. Usually incapable of independant thinking and making choices without their parents doing it for them.

Now my rant is over as well.

Bart

#6 Kite Krusader

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Posted 01 December 2008 - 07:10 AM

I aggree with what you are saying, and this is for the purpose of information, and not to be taken as a scare tactic, and as always you should give your kids support and observation in all stages of life.

I myself rember fond memorys of making MUD PIES when I was younger.

The key is good parenting skills, and to be informed on choices, and if you buy a harmful product that you know could hurt your child then is that good parenting?
Your friendly neighborhood kite flyer.

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#7 Sailor99

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Posted 01 December 2008 - 07:36 AM

An emotive subject. I say take the easy option - buy them a kite for Christmas!

Happy holidays, what ever present you get (there I think I am the first to say the HH phrase - do I win a SUL?)
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#8 Martyjuggles

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Posted 01 December 2008 - 09:37 AM

I aggree with what you are saying, and this is for the purpose of information, and not to be taken as a scare tactic, and as always you should give your kids support and observation in all stages of life.

I myself rember fond memorys of making MUD PIES when I was younger.

The key is good parenting skills, and to be informed on choices, and if you buy a harmful product that you know could hurt your child then is that good parenting?


Definitely agree KK - the key is about parenting - unfortunately all too often the only information that gets to parents is the health and safety hype and not the pragmatic balanced view - whatever happened to common sense??!

Sorry to bang on - I got my head into 'work mode' where i spend large amounts of my time campaigning for children's right to play freely and not be be fettered with health and safety scares, media hype about boogie men and obesity strategies. . . .

Sailor - kites for christmas??? - hmmmm like your thinking . . .

:P
Thinking about a stack . . .

For life outside of kiting please read my Lymphoma Charity Blog:
http://www.marti-tho...0.blogspot.com/

#9 big bri

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Posted 01 December 2008 - 09:49 AM

An emotive subject. I say take the easy option - buy them a kite for Christmas!

Happy holidays, what ever present you get (there I think I am the first to say the HH phrase - do I win a SUL?)



lol.nope.ya not pal.I wacked ya to it yesterday.

Thing is though,it was November yesterday and ive been calling folk not fit.Because Christmas Starts around EASTER....lol

On the Parent thing,mine didnt come with a handbook and i think we would not take kindly to being told to use one.If my two did a hundreth of what i got up to as a lad.I would be BALD with worry.

Im not one for statistics and Dr Spok either.We just try to steerum the best way we know how.

BRIAN...LUV UMs best

#10 kitecowboy

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Posted 01 December 2008 - 09:59 AM

i may be showing my hand here but it seems a bit daft to specifically name and shame products for containing magnets, balloons, being pointy or lengths of string since numerous toys and household items (including things i regularly let my kids play with) have these features. Saying children shouldn't play with balloons or string potentially robs them of the simple pleasures of childhood.

My kids are 5 and 3 and i actively encourage them to play with string, fire, sharp stuff, hot things, magnets, balloons and to climb to height because they help children to risk assess for themselves, they do this with graduated support and observation from myself and my wife.

While i think that reports of this nature are useful and informative, without appropriate context they encourage a culture of fear and for parents to remove risk from children's lives completely. This is VERY dangerous in my opinion.

Did you know that a recent study of hospital admissions in the UK showed a significant decrease in admissions for children falling out of trees with almost TWICE AS MANY children being injured from falling off beds!!! In the same year there was a 35% increase in repetitive strain injuries attributed to computer games.

Personally i would rather my children risk a minor burn, bruise scratch or graze than grow up with a sanitized, sterile childhood. . . . my best memories of childhood were when i was pushing my own mental and physical boundaries to the point of being scared . . . .

rant over

:blushing:



Ditto. :) The only thing between me and the dashboard was a coat of paint. ;)
Cowboy, rocks in your pockets couldn't hurt.

#11 kitecowboy

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Posted 01 December 2008 - 10:03 AM

I was gonna get my kids big bubbles to keep them in, but they came in plastic bags. I'm so confused. :wacko: :rolleyes: :ani_wallbash:
Cowboy, rocks in your pockets couldn't hurt.

#12 Jynx

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Posted 01 December 2008 - 01:05 PM

The Darwin Awards go to the people who successfully remove themselves from the gene pool.

"When the power of love becomes more important than the love of power,

then there will be peace"

Jimi Hendrix

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#13 nobodyspecial

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Posted 01 December 2008 - 01:31 PM

Only things on there that common sense wouldn't be able to tell would be the lead laced bag, Other then that, If you get your children a toy that may "be dangerous" and you don't watch your child or teach them how to use it safely it's your own fault. I'm with you guys on the the whole no idea how I survived childhood thing, climbing trees, bike riding down the autobahn, being a general nuisance with junior chem lab stuff. people dont need to blame companies for problems they can control. these things always crack me up. Next there going to say that bicycling may be hazardous to your health, may cause shortness of breath, and muscle pain, and induced hunger.

#14 Jynx

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Posted 01 December 2008 - 01:41 PM

And there's always the fear of kite line strangulation!

"When the power of love becomes more important than the love of power,

then there will be peace"

Jimi Hendrix

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#15 browndude3649

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Posted 01 December 2008 - 07:28 PM

And there's always the fear of kite line strangulation!


Not a kite! They'll put an eye out!!!

I remember sqeezing myself under steel plates of construction sites while trolleys passed by. We called it tunnel ratting.
Then we'd throw rocks at each other. The kind they used for railroad beds.And i still survived!!!




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