Jump to content


Photo

Want a free Rev?


  • Please log in to reply
165 replies to this topic

#141 Choccy

Choccy

    Occasion-al Flyer

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,880 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Southern England

Posted 09 December 2008 - 03:32 AM

The fact that this one is accented in lime suggests it needs a proper British name ...

Nothing British about this Co. name. (It's American so Google tells me).

I don't see the connection, sorry.

RS67man "I am sure Choccy will give it the stamp of approval"

Nothing to do with me.

:innocent: <_<

Think you'll find ppl who have been flying a lot longer than myself have been naming their kites.

Enjoy your new kite.

PS an example of a British name could have been Diamond White (well it's consumed a lot here) :kid_devlish:
1 of the 47.

#142 Sailor99

Sailor99

    Forum Veteran

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,334 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Hampshire, UK

Posted 09 December 2008 - 04:49 AM

I believe Jeepster was referring to the practice of British sailors to take lime juice with their grog. The benefit was of course that they got their vitamin C and thus avoided scurvy. Hence limies is a mildly derogatory nickname for 'thee and me' - Brits.

Boats have names, cars have names, children have names, even bicycles have names! So why not kites.
Over - Jeremy

Posted Image

Knowledge: The small part of ignorance that we arrange and classify.

#143 Choccy

Choccy

    Occasion-al Flyer

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,880 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Southern England

Posted 09 December 2008 - 05:02 AM

It's 'Pudders' who has a 'problem' with ppl naming their kites. :blue-confused:


BTW I have not named my new midvent....yet.....
1 of the 47.

#144 Jeepster

Jeepster

    Curmudgeon

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 937 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington, IL

Posted 09 December 2008 - 06:33 AM

I believe Jeepster was referring to the practice of British sailors to take lime juice with their grog. The benefit was of course that they got their vitamin C and thus avoided scurvy. Hence limies is a mildly derogatory nickname for 'thee and me' - Brits.

Boats have names, cars have names, children have names, even bicycles have names! So why not kites.


Sailor,

If received even as a "mildly" derogatory term, then my apologies mate.

If it wouldn't have been for a couple of Brits fooling around a number of generations ago, my branch in the tree of life would be missing. Actually there seems to have been lots of fooling around in all of Great Britain in my background. So simply can't have negative feelings on my part.

As to naming a kite ... hmmmm. Scientists have been going on forever naming and cataloging and retaining everything they stumble upon. We name our kids 'cuz calling them "hey you third child" gets to be a little time consuming. And roads 'cuz "the four lane from London to Leicester" gets a little cumbersome when giving directions. But with kites it seems to start so innocently. First it's just "the kite." Then it becomes "the vented" kite and the "non-vented" kite. Then you add "the SUL" kite. It's only after awhile that one finds themselves with long names like "the gold vented amateur-series" kite 'cuz the damn things seem to breed when left alone in a kite bag. I'm sure a mid-vent is the by-product of a vented and a non-vent fooling around in the kite bag.

Cheers,
Tom

#145 Sailor99

Sailor99

    Forum Veteran

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,334 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Hampshire, UK

Posted 09 December 2008 - 07:56 AM

If received even as a "mildly" derogatory term, then my apologies mate.


s' OK - I said mildly derogatory not offensive! Much more like calling a mate your mucker, or the term SWMBO for that other mate. A little poke in the ribs by way of friendliness.
Over - Jeremy

Posted Image

Knowledge: The small part of ignorance that we arrange and classify.

#146 pudsli

pudsli

    Occasional Poster

  • Forum Member
  • PipPip
  • 143 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:sunny stockport u.k

Posted 09 December 2008 - 08:21 AM

hi choccy.
it' your kite you call it what you want.
i'll be more impresed when it answers you back.
just fly it.
all the best steve (pudders)
Member of British S.T.A.C.K winter league pairs champs 2006/2007

#147 Choccy

Choccy

    Occasion-al Flyer

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,880 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Southern England

Posted 09 December 2008 - 08:33 AM

i'll be more impresed when it answers you back.

oh but she does ;)

She's very reluctant to get back in the bag,
especially if I've only just got her out and the wind fades :blushing:

Jeepster> we're just filling time here until you get to fly your new kite and take a pic :ani_whistling: :blue-grin:
1 of the 47.

#148 Jeepster

Jeepster

    Curmudgeon

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 937 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington, IL

Posted 09 December 2008 - 08:50 AM

Jeepster> we're just filling time here until you get to fly your new kite and take a pic :ani_whistling: :blue-grin:


The weather here in the mid-west is really PANTS! Had snow and bitter cold last week with a steady rain today. Ground's frozen, so the rain and melting snow is simply making a mess of everything. Can't take a lady out in pig muck like this.

Cheers,
Tom

#149 Sailor99

Sailor99

    Forum Veteran

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,334 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Hampshire, UK

Posted 09 December 2008 - 09:05 AM

The weather here in the mid-west is really PANTS!


Gee, its mighty fine of you to talk to us in UK English buddy. ;)
Over - Jeremy

Posted Image

Knowledge: The small part of ignorance that we arrange and classify.

#150 quaa714

quaa714

    REVular poster

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,976 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:wherever there's a breeze!!!

Posted 09 December 2008 - 09:08 AM

Gee, its mighty fine of you to talk to us in UK English buddy. ;)



I understand the sentiment but please define PANTS!

"Cya in the Sand!....."

"Slack lines are fine lines!"


"You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows" BD
"One good thing about music, when it hits you feel no pain" BM
av-1950.jpg


#151 Sailor99

Sailor99

    Forum Veteran

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,334 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Hampshire, UK

Posted 09 December 2008 - 09:12 AM

Noun/Adj. Nonsense, rubbish, bad. From the standard British English of pants, meaning underwear; also a variation on 'knickers'. E.g."The first half was pants but I stayed until the end and it was actually a great film."
Exclam. An exclamation of annoyance or frustration. From the noun, (above).
Over - Jeremy

Posted Image

Knowledge: The small part of ignorance that we arrange and classify.

#152 Jeepster

Jeepster

    Curmudgeon

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 937 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington, IL

Posted 09 December 2008 - 09:38 AM

I understand the sentiment but please define PANTS!

quaa,

Stone in Shoe Bob took pity on me and shared this web site ... Pants!... quite awhile ago. The British English have taken so many liberties with the language, that it's imperative to keep it open when reading their posts.

Cheers,
Tom

Now where did I put my Nomex suit? Hmmm ... got to be around here someplace. Maybe I'll just make a break for the door,

#153 Sailor99

Sailor99

    Forum Veteran

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,334 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Hampshire, UK

Posted 09 December 2008 - 10:49 AM

Tom what gives with the bummer on the mum Tongue. Like, y'know do I look bovered in'it. Watever. ;)
Over - Jeremy

Posted Image

Knowledge: The small part of ignorance that we arrange and classify.

#154 Jeepster

Jeepster

    Curmudgeon

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 937 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington, IL

Posted 09 December 2008 - 12:01 PM

Tom what gives with the bummer on the mum Tongue. Like, y'know do I look bovered in'it. Watever. ;)


I rest my case ...

Actually, the English language is probably the most difficult language to use for clarity in exchanging ideas between different nationalities. We have a hoard of shared words that have different meanings in our various countries ... or at least have additional meanings. When talking with someone who uses English as a second language, we tend to double and triple check to make sure we understand each other. But, when conversing with others, who use English as a first language, we tend to apply our understanding of the word and charge on ... invariably the conversation soon becomes high centered.

Heck, even within a single country there are countless differences. In sailing terms, to "run aground" means to run the ship/boat onto a spot of land such that you're stranded. Yes? Will along the outer banks of the US, it also means that you've eaten too much. Interesting use of the language, but not very helpful for keeping the exchange of ideas clear.

Computers, e-mail and text messaging have created their own sub-language. That's also not helping the mix, but that belongs in another thread.

I do love the English language in all of it's adaptations ... it keeps life interesting. Now, as you were saying!

YMMV,
Tom

#155 Sailor99

Sailor99

    Forum Veteran

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,334 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Hampshire, UK

Posted 09 December 2008 - 01:01 PM

I had not come across that meaning of run aground. I must research that when I have ADSL. If you know the history if please do let me know. It is bound to come from the joint grand banks fleets so may well have it's roots in Ireland.

As you say, back OT, nice prize you won there!
Over - Jeremy

Posted Image

Knowledge: The small part of ignorance that we arrange and classify.

#156 DB Cooper

DB Cooper

    Occasional Poster

  • Forum Member
  • PipPip
  • 145 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Germantown, Il

Posted 10 December 2008 - 05:30 PM

Well I have been lurking long enough, Jeepster talked me into joining the forums. I felt this was an appropriate start.

John - The kite you so graciously gave my dad is absolutely gorgeous. The pictures do not do it justice at all. I tried to talk him into selling it to me, but he said that would be poor form with such a nice kite and a great prize. I guess I will have to continue bumming flights from him.

Second, I work with a Brit and he brings constant chuckles to all those around with all of his slang. He in turn laughs at all of us and our American oddities.

Jamie

#157 Aerochic

Aerochic

    Revadelic

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,722 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Pennsylvania

Posted 10 December 2008 - 05:50 PM

I understand the sentiment but please define PANTS!


LOL! I asked the same thing just very recently. That was one odd piece of British slang I hadn't heard before.

Better Living Through Rev Flying...

Rev Themed Ts & Goodies: http://www.zazzle.co...ckarts/clothing
Aerostakes: http://www.etsy.com/shop/LeshockArts
Rev Galleries: http://www.revkites....=user&user=1408
Flickr Pics: http://www.flickr.co...s/16896184@N05/


#158 Love2fly

Love2fly

    All Revved up... where do you want to fly?

  • Forum Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,870 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:New Jersey, USA

Posted 10 December 2008 - 06:24 PM

Welcome to the Darkside, Jamie.

I love the little nuances that the English language (any form) offers! Combine that with this forum setting, and we get a language lesson on top of all the good flying tips.... very cool!!
Laura
 
*** Any day flying is a good day; have a great one! 
**** REVS: Fly it, you'll like it!
***** L.S.P. ... It's worth the trip!
 
Posted Image

#159 Kitelife

Kitelife

    Forum Guru

  • Forum Host
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,934 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, OR USA

Posted 10 December 2008 - 06:26 PM

Aye, welcome Jamie. ;)

Watty has the milk and cookies, if you get peckish.

John Barresi

johnbarresi.com | kitelife.com | learnkites.com | teamiquad.comkitemap.org
youtube.com/kitelife | facebook.com/kitelifemagazine | KiteLife on Google+

 

President - American Kitefliers Association

"We cannot direct the wind, but we can adjust the sails."
(found in a fortune cookie - possibly an Einstein quote)

My full list of kite articles - kitelife.com/author/john-barresi
 

Please reward posts that are helpful, give positive reputation by clicking on "Like This" button on the right side of each post.


#160 DB Cooper

DB Cooper

    Occasional Poster

  • Forum Member
  • PipPip
  • 145 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Germantown, Il

Posted 10 December 2008 - 06:32 PM

Aye, welcome Jamie. ;)

Watty has the milk and cookies, if you get peckish.


The darkside indeed, thank you all for the welcome, however I think my wife will need the milk and cookies though, she is the one who may get irritable the first time a $200 kite arrives. :P

I was thinking maybe all prices should be posted as a factor of ten lower than actual. That way when a spouse checks they will believe your story that it only cost $28.90 and it was such a good deal you need another.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users