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#1 Windbag

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Posted 25 October 2008 - 10:00 PM

[attachment=3185:Rev_spars_resize.jpg]Today was the second time I've flown my new Rev 2. Yesterday there was too much wind at the beach so I looked for a grass playground at a local high school. Winds were gusty & maybe 8-10 mph. I had the 3 wrap spars all in the kite lying with the vertical spars down & the vertical Vs of the kite facing me while attaching the lines to the bridle. I attached the right side & moved to the left side.

A gust of wind caught the right V & the sail of the kite flipping it to the left & forward snapping the leading edge spars at the left joint. It shattered the left end of the center spar as well as the right end of the left hand piece. Yesterday at the beach I assembled in the same fashion but threw several handfuls of sand on the right V to keep it in place but no sand today & I never gave it a thought.

So, the question. Should I assemble upside down & backwards so the V is facing away & can't catch the wind?

Should the vertical spars be the last to go in so the wind just flaps the V of the kite but breaks nothing?

What is the safest way to keep from breaking this new toy?

I did have my 2 wrap frame as a backup so I could fly for a few hours. I don't know what new frame pieces cost but would prefer not to do this again.

Any ideas or suggestions from more experienced fliers are appreciated.
Have fun, Ray.

#2 deebs1596

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Posted 25 October 2008 - 10:18 PM

one thing i always do is i assemble it LE down- that is leading edge facing you(the V away) and assemble like regular but when you stand the kite up to launch, have it LE inverted and reverse launch. just back the kite up and go. wind wont catch the V and flip it it will just go over the kite but wont launch it, saving you money on replacement parts
----Dan-----

lost in thought or lost in a field... either way send a search party

i fly what i can and stare at what i cant.

#3 Guest_QuadQrazy_*

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Posted 25 October 2008 - 10:33 PM

To take your kite out again attach your lines to your kite (leading edge down and kite lying flat on the ground down wind) unwind your lines and attach your handles. DO NOT TRY AND UNWRAP YOUR LINES UNTIL YOU HAVE THEM ON YOUR HANDLES.

Use your kite stake to hold the handles, and walk back to the kite.

Keep the leading edge down wind, step behind the kite put one sail against your knee ( called a wind brake) and attach the down spar, and repeat for other side. (the vertical spars should be the last to go in.)

Prop your kite up, and lean it back ( so it wont take off by its self ) then walk back to your handles, and launch.

#4 tonycarl

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Posted 26 October 2008 - 01:00 AM

To attach the lines to a rev in high winds stakes your handles, run the lines out, split the pairs, assemble kite, hold leading edge of rev in the middle, lay rev down on top of the ends of the lines with the leading edge facing the wind and the bridle side of the kite facing down. Go to the v which is now down wind, lift up the bottom of one side so you have access to the bridle and end of lines. make the connections. Do the same for the other side, stand kite up, preferably inverted (less strain on the vertical spars in high winds) . It's a little awkward, but by having the v down wind and lifting the bottoms to make the connections will force the kite against the ground minimizing mishaps in high winds.

#5 Jeepster

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Posted 26 October 2008 - 04:58 AM

What is the safest way to keep from breaking this new toy?


In an older video, Joe H. taught the method that TonyCarl explained in his post. My first kite was a B-series and in that DVD John B. teaches a slightly different method. One point that is common to both methods is that the leading edge always faces upwind ... the V-tips have a mind of their own when facing into the wind.

Here's what I've settled on:

1) Hook your lines to the handles, stake the handles, play out the lines and separate the two pairs to arm's length ... don't separate all four lines yet.

2) Assemble the leading edge with your back to the wind ... you can do it standing up or if it's really windy lay it on the ground. Once the leading edge is assembled, install the vertical rods. Don't flip the kite ... when it's assembled this way the front of the kite is facing away from you.

3) Don't flip the kite ... just lay it down on the ground with the leading edge into the wind and the front of the kite facing upwards.

4) Separate one pair of lines to arms length and attach to the kite . Separate the second pair and attach to the kite.

5) Don't flip the kite ... just stand it up inverted ... leading edge down.

The advantage to this method is that the leading edge is always facing into the wind and you never have to flip or rotate the kite ... the front of the kite always faces upward. Having the leading edge facing downwind or flipping the kite is an invitation to a wrestling match. I've watched several of our club members switch kites and leave their unused kite on the ground with the leading edge into the wind, no lines attached and nothing to hold it down ... darn thing just stays in place.

For me this method works well, your mileage may vary.

Cheers,
Tom

#6 Watty

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Posted 26 October 2008 - 06:52 AM

[attachment=3185:Rev_spars_resize.jpg]Today was the second time I've flown my new Rev 2. Yesterday there was too much wind at the beach so I looked for a grass playground at a local high school. Winds were gusty & maybe 8-10 mph. I had the 3 wrap spars all in the kite lying with the vertical spars down & the vertical Vs of the kite facing me while attaching the lines to the bridle. I attached the right side & moved to the left side.

A gust of wind caught the right V & the sail of the kite flipping it to the left & forward snapping the leading edge spars at the left joint. It shattered the left end of the center spar as well as the right end of the left hand piece. Yesterday at the beach I assembled in the same fashion but threw several handfuls of sand on the right V to keep it in place but no sand today & I never gave it a thought.

So, the question. Should I assemble upside down & backwards so the V is facing away & can't catch the wind?

Should the vertical spars be the last to go in so the wind just flaps the V of the kite but breaks nothing?

What is the safest way to keep from breaking this new toy?

I did have my 2 wrap frame as a backup so I could fly for a few hours. I don't know what new frame pieces cost but would prefer not to do this again.

Any ideas or suggestions from more experienced fliers are appreciated.


When you assemble your kite, always keep the kite with the LE facing the wind. If you do this you will have no problems with the sail flipping over, because the heaviest part of the kite will keep it down.

Spence "Watty" Watson

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#7 deebs1596

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Posted 26 October 2008 - 07:12 AM

LE downwind is the most common and from what ive found; the most safe. as watty said

the heaviest part of the kite will keep it down

also the leading edge is more rigid than the V and the tips. on the V and tips the sail is loose-where it is attacched to the leading edge so it wont try and lift off on you when your not flying it
----Dan-----

lost in thought or lost in a field... either way send a search party

i fly what i can and stare at what i cant.

#8 Windbag

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Posted 26 October 2008 - 11:41 AM

one thing i always do is i assemble it LE down- that is leading edge facing you(the V away) and assemble like regular but when you stand the kite up to launch, have it LE inverted and reverse launch. just back the kite up and go. wind wont catch the V and flip it it will just go over the kite but wont launch it, saving you money on replacement parts


Thanks for the tips. I think Vs downwind & away from me would keep the wind from catching the sail. I'll try that next time.
Have fun, Ray.

#9 Windbag

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Posted 26 October 2008 - 11:46 AM

To take your kite out again attach your lines to your kite (leading edge down and kite lying flat on the ground down wind) unwind your lines and attach your handles.

Do you put anything on the kite to try to keep it flat & keep the wind from catching it?


Use your kite stake to hold the handles, and walk back to the kite.

Keep the leading edge down wind, step behind the kite put one sail against your knee ( called a wind break) and attach the down spar, and repeat for other side. (the vertical spars should be the last to go in.)

I like the brace against my knees. This sounds much safer.



Thanks for the tips.
Have fun, Ray.

#10 Windbag

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Posted 26 October 2008 - 11:52 AM

To attach the lines to a rev in high winds stakes your handles, run the lines out, split the pairs, assemble kite, hold leading edge of rev in the middle, lay rev down on top of the ends of the lines with the leading edge facing the wind and the bridle side of the kite facing down. Go to the v which is now down wind, lift up the bottom of one side so you have access to the bridle and end of lines. make the connections. Do the same for the other side, stand kite up, preferably inverted (less strain on the vertical spars in high winds) . It's a little awkward, but by having the v down wind and lifting the bottoms to make the connections will force the kite against the ground minimizing mishaps in high winds.


So far it seems I should be assembling with the Vs down wind & launching inverted. My mistake on both counts. I'll fix that the next time out.

Thanks for your tips
Have fun, Ray.

#11 Windbag

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Posted 26 October 2008 - 12:03 PM

[quote name='Jeepster' date='Oct 26 2008, 05:58 AM' post='32822']
In an older video, Joe H. taught the method that TonyCarl explained in his post. My first kite was a B-series and in that DVD John B. teaches a slightly different method. One point that is common to both methods is that the leading edge always faces upwind ... the V-tips have a mind of their own when facing into the wind.

Wow' it sounds like I should have paid more attention to the video that John created. I watched it twice but obviously missed that point. Having now flown two times I'll go back & look for more wisdom from the video.

Here's what I've settled on:

1) Hook your lines to the handles, stake the handles, play out the lines and separate the two pairs to arm's length ... don't separate all four lines yet.

2) Assemble the leading edge with your back to the wind ... you can do it standing up or if it's really windy lay it on the ground. Once the leading edge is assembled, install the vertical rods. Don't flip the kite ... when it's assembled this way the front of the kite is facing away from you.

3) Don't flip the kite ... just lay it down on the ground with the leading edge into the wind and the front of the kite facing upwards.

4) Separate one pair of lines to arms length and attach to the kite . Separate the second pair and attach to the kite.

5) Don't flip the kite ... just stand it up inverted ... leading edge down.

This will probably be the key to protecting the spars. Launching inverted means I either have to switch handles after the launch or reverse them before launch. What is the best way?

The advantage to this method is that the leading edge is always facing into the wind and you never have to flip or rotate the kite ... the front of the kite always faces upward. Having the leading edge facing downwind or flipping the kite is an invitation to a wrestling match. I've watched several of our club members switch kites and leave their unused kite on the ground with the leading edge into the wind, no lines attached and nothing to hold it down ... darn thing just stays in place.

I guess the leading edge being straight & tight keeps the wind from getting under the kite. The Vs facing into the wind are apparently much easier for the wind to get under.

For me this method works well, your mileage may vary.

Thanks for the tips.
Have fun, Ray.

#12 Windbag

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Posted 26 October 2008 - 12:13 PM

When you assemble your kite, always keep the kite with the LE facing the wind. If you do this you will have no problems with the sail flipping over, because the heaviest part of the kite will keep it down.


Yes, I think this is the key. I guess this is how wisdom is acquired. I won't soon forget this lesson.

Thanks for your input.
Have fun, Ray.

#13 Windbag

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Posted 26 October 2008 - 01:02 PM

LE downwind is the most common and from what ive found; the most safe. as watty said also the leading edge is more rigid than the V and the tips. on the V and tips the sail is loose-where it is attached to the leading edge so it wont try and lift off on you when your not flying it


I did have one time yesterday that the kite lifted off before I got back to the handles. I have been setting the kite up with the LE up & tipping it back. Probably the safest would be with the LE down & the Vs up & back. I'm learning. Just fly off inverted & flip over to fly.

Thanks for the input.
Have fun, Ray.

#14 deebs1596

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Posted 26 October 2008 - 08:54 PM

u dont need to switch the handles. what you do it pick up your handles and pop a brake line lightly and see which tip reacts,left tip (normally left hand) goes in left hand like usual. Right tip goes right handle right hand. As long as you remember right hand=right tip; left hand=left tip and "thumbs forward &step back" when launching inverted you should have no problem launching inverted.
----Dan-----

lost in thought or lost in a field... either way send a search party

i fly what i can and stare at what i cant.

#15 Watty

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Posted 27 October 2008 - 05:26 AM

I did have one time yesterday that the kite lifted off before I got back to the handles. I have been setting the kite up with the LE up & tipping it back. Probably the safest would be with the LE down & the Vs up & back. I'm learning. Just fly off inverted & flip over to fly.

Thanks for the input.


Yes, when I set up my kites, I set it up LE down. Then, when I go back to the handles, I hold them upside down so that there are no twists in the lines, then put the handles together, and flip them over. This will pu the handles in the correct hands with the correct twis for the kite being inverted.

Spence "Watty" Watson

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#16 Windbag

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Posted 27 October 2008 - 01:16 PM

u dont need to switch the handles. what you do it pick up your handles and pop a brake line lightly and see which tip reacts,left tip (normally left hand) goes in left hand like usual. Right tip goes right handle right hand. As long as you remember right hand=right tip; left hand=left tip and "thumbs forward &step back" when launching inverted you should have no problem launching inverted.


Ah, yes. The tip that moves identifies the hand the handle should be in. I've got inverted launch down but still working on inverted hover. Still wants to turn over shortly after 5' above the ground. I'll try this the next time I'm out.

Thanks for the tips.
Have fun, Ray.

#17 Windbag

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Posted 27 October 2008 - 01:20 PM

Yes, when I set up my kites, I set it up LE down. Then, when I go back to the handles, I hold them upside down so that there are no twists in the lines, then put the handles together, and flip them over. This will pu the handles in the correct hands with the correct twis for the kite being inverted.


This sounds like it might be a little easier than Deebs tip above so will try both then choose. No wind & all overcast today like it might start to rain.

Thanks for the input.
Have fun, Ray.

#18 Dean750

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Posted 27 October 2008 - 04:42 PM

The original way of setting up the kite to fly is still the best way. I've never had the kite even think of flipping or launching.

Attach the lines to handles. Top of left handle faces right on the stake and oppisite the right handle. Top line will be the inner most line on each side. Fully assemble your Rev and lay LE into the wind with the bridle down. Your lines should be visible past the lower tips of the kite by a foot or two. Kneel behind one tip and holding the tip lift that one wing. Attach inner most line to the top bridle tow point then the outter most line. Lay the tip back down and repeat on the other side. After both sets of lines are secure you can stand the kite up to which ever way your comfortable with. LE up is how it will want to stand up. You'll have to rotate it 180 if you want it inverted.

Dean

#19 Windbag

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Posted 28 October 2008 - 09:28 PM

The original way of setting up the kite to fly is still the best way. I've never had the kite even think of flipping or launching.

Attach the lines to handles. Top of left handle faces right on the stake and oppisite the right handle. Top line will be the inner most line on each side. Fully assemble your Rev and lay LE into the wind with the bridle down. Your lines should be visible past the lower tips of the kite by a foot or two. Kneel behind one tip and holding the tip lift that one wing. Attach inner most line to the top bridle tow point then the outter most line. Lay the tip back down and repeat on the other side. After both sets of lines are secure you can stand the kite up to which ever way your comfortable with. LE up is how it will want to stand up. You'll have to rotate it 180 if you want it inverted.

Dean


Dean, I'm a little unclear on the handle position at the stake. It seems I remember from my first few trips if I'm going to launch LE up the bottom pigtail has to be around the stake so the kite can lean back with both lines fairly tight. Launching inverted would be the reverse. Or does it really matter if both lines are tight.

I did go to the beach this afternoon & no wind. I assembled the kite lines the way you suggested but could only get a few feet off the ground then back down. I think this way will work for me. Just need some wind.

I did manage to get my lines twisted up & took a while to get untangled. I've been larksheading the ends of the RH & LH lines together at the handle end before winding them on the winder. Do you larkshead both ends in sets so less chance of tangle?

Thanks for your input.
Have fun, Ray.

#20 Windbag

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Posted 28 October 2008 - 09:28 PM

The original way of setting up the kite to fly is still the best way. I've never had the kite even think of flipping or launching.

Attach the lines to handles. Top of left handle faces right on the stake and oppisite the right handle. Top line will be the inner most line on each side. Fully assemble your Rev and lay LE into the wind with the bridle down. Your lines should be visible past the lower tips of the kite by a foot or two. Kneel behind one tip and holding the tip lift that one wing. Attach inner most line to the top bridle tow point then the outter most line. Lay the tip back down and repeat on the other side. After both sets of lines are secure you can stand the kite up to which ever way your comfortable with. LE up is how it will want to stand up. You'll have to rotate it 180 if you want it inverted.

Dean


Dean, I'm a little unclear on the handle position at the stake. It seems I remember from my first few trips if I'm going to launch LE up the bottom pigtail has to be around the stake so the kite can lean back with both lines fairly tight. Launching inverted would be the reverse. Or does it really matter if both lines are tight.

I did go to the beach this afternoon & no wind. I assembled the kite lines the way you suggested but could only get a few feet off the ground then back down. I think this way will work for me. Just need some wind.

I did manage to get my lines twisted up & took a while to get untangled. I've been larksheading the ends of the RH & LH lines together at the handle end before winding them on the winder. Do you larkshead both ends in sets so less chance of tangle?

Thanks for your input.
Have fun, Ray.




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