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Power Blast 2-4 as a First Quad


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#1 accrk

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Posted 18 September 2008 - 09:11 AM

I want a PB 2-4. I know that it's best to learn on a 1.5, but it's the power of the 2-4 that interests me the most and I don't want to spend the time/money learning a trick kite just for the "training" aspect of it. Please give me your thoughts on this plan: I'm thinking that I might try to learn on the 2-4 on days/areas with very light winds. In my area, those days are common anyway, and under very light winds I understand it might even be easier than keeping a 1.5 up. Then, as I get better, I can use it in stronger winds.

So my bottom-line question is, would it be possible/practical to take this approach or am I just setting myself up for frustration in trying to learn with a kite that isn't made for beginners? If I'd like to end up with a 2-4, is learning on a 1.5 a "necessity"?

#2 Jonesey

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Posted 18 September 2008 - 09:28 AM

I want a PB 2-4. I know that it's best to learn on a 1.5, but it's the power of the 2-4 that interests me the most and I don't want to spend the time/money learning a trick kite just for the "training" aspect of it. Please give me your thoughts on this plan: I'm thinking that I might try to learn on the 2-4 on days/areas with very light winds. In my area, those days are common anyway, and under very light winds I understand it might even be easier than keeping a 1.5 up. Then, as I get better, I can use it in stronger winds.

So my bottom-line question is, would it be possible/practical to take this approach or am I just setting myself up for frustration in trying to learn with a kite that isn't made for beginners? If I'd like to end up with a 2-4, is learning on a 1.5 a "necessity"?



May I first get the formal bit out of the way and say welcome :)

I guess the obvious question is what do you want to do with your Rev?? if its for Buggying/mountain boarding etc then your plan sort of makes sense ... either way I would strongly suggest you spend some time learning on a 1.5 or the like first ... not necessarily buying one but using a friends or other local rev flyers (where do you live??), I think Rev flyers are universally generous when it comes to handing over their handles ... if that just isn't practical then hell why not! The 2~4 was one of my first Rev's and I definitely wasn't ready for it and I have to say the DVD that comes with it is probably the best learning aid to Rev flying there is (IMHO) ....

I love my 2~4 and fly it whenever I can .... but only in winds below @ 12 knots .. whilst the power is controllably even my 110 kilos means I am in survival mode in anything above that .... In which case I use my Blast and then my Shockwave if I still want some power fun ...

Oh and I wouldn't assume the rest of the range are just 'trick' kites until you have tried a Rev 1 in 20 knots ;)

#3 Watty

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Posted 18 September 2008 - 11:03 AM

I think it would be in you best interest to learn on a kite that is easier to handle first. It will definitely make the whole learning experience much smoother. However, if all you are into is the power and buggying and such, I'd suggest learning on a smaller quad line para-foil kite (I think that's what they are called). That way, it isn't drastically cutting into your budget, and you can get the feel of a quad line kite before moving on to the behemoth.

Spence "Watty" Watson

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