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Which Rev Kite for a beginner?


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#1 FlyingFrog

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Posted 28 July 2008 - 07:15 AM

Hi Guys, I'm new to this forum and Revolution Kites. I have spent quite a time Power kiting and buggying but due to a buggy accident I am selling up my power kites and buggy so that I can go over to flying a Revolution kite. I already fly twin line delta stunt kites and have experience with 4 line kites. The advice that I am looking for is:
Which model of Revolution kite would you all suggest as the best for me to start learning with? I do not necessarily want the cheapest as a "better" or more advanced model will save me from upgatding later. At the same time I can't afford the most expensive on the market. Also what UK Revolution Dealer is the best to go to and finally, are there any places I could possibly find a pre-owned Revolution Kite as a starter model?
Sorry this is a bit long winded but I love my kiting and don't want to buy the wrong one or one that isn't suitable for me.

#2 steveb

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Posted 28 July 2008 - 07:44 AM

You can't go wrong with a B-Series Rev.

I've found that if I'm interested in something, it's less expensive to buy the "good stuff" first, rather than start out with a cheap beginner's model and then gradually work my way through mid-range and intermediate kites until I finally talk myself into buying the one I should have got in the first place.

#3 Baloo

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Posted 28 July 2008 - 09:17 AM

I would agree with steveb.

Best you can do is get a B series both standard and vented. You are covered for all situations and wind speeds, (well as long as it is above dead calm. If you are good that will be no problem either) I have flown my B Vented with 2 leading edge spars in it at above 50mph winds.

The standard B comes with 2 and 3 wrap spars. The Vented has 3 and 4 wrap. If you find a VERY kind dealer you might be able to get them to swap out the second 3 wrap for a Race set (at extra cost) then you are REALY set up for all conditions. The B's come as a packege however and it might be that you will not get the frame swap deal easily.

Cheaper you could go for a SLE, personaly I would want to swap the SLE rods for some of the thinner ones as I find the SLE both rigid and heavy. (personal choice)

Cheaper again an EXP. Nothing at all wrong with an EXP, LOADS of fliers will have started with one. I know I did. am well into double figures with Revs now.

I would reccomend Kiteworld in the UK. If you go for the buy from the US route I have had good dealings with THeresa at Thekiteshoppe. You can wait a long time and have taxes to pay though. If Kiteworld have it in stock you could have it within a couple of days.

Hope this all helps. I am sure you will get more advice.

What power kites do you have. A mate of mine is looking for a 3 mtr ish 4 line?? Any chance you can pm me with what you have and what you want.

#4 FlyingFrog

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Posted 28 July 2008 - 09:23 AM

I would agree with steveb.

Best you can do is get a B series both standard and vented. You are covered for all situations and wind speeds, (well as long as it is above dead calm. If you are good that will be no problem either) I have flown my B Vented with 2 leading edge spars in it at above 50mph winds.

The standard B comes with 2 and 3 wrap spars. The Vented has 3 and 4 wrap. If you find a VERY kind dealer you might be able to get them to swap out the second 3 wrap for a Race set (at extra cost) then you are REALY set up for all conditions. The B's come as a packege however and it might be that you will not get the frame swap deal easily.

Cheaper you could go for a SLE, personaly I would want to swap the SLE rods for some of the thinner ones as I find the SLE both rigid and heavy. (personal choice)

Cheaper again an EXP. Nothing at all wrong with an EXP, LOADS of fliers will have started with one. I know I did. am well into double figures with Revs now.

I would reccomend Kiteworld in the UK. If you go for the buy from the US route I have had good dealings with THeresa at Thekiteshoppe. You can wait a long time and have taxes to pay though. If Kiteworld have it in stock you could have it within a couple of days.

Hope this all helps. I am sure you will get more advice.

What power kites do you have. A mate of mine is looking for a 3 mtr ish 4 line?? Any chance you can pm me with what you have and what you want.


The only power kite in that size that I have is a Beamer 3.6Meter which someone has shown an interest in. I have asked them to let me know for tomorrow morning so if they don't want to buy it I will contact you and tell you more then.
Many Thanks
Pete Bony (FlyingFrog)

#5 Stone in Shoe Bob

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Posted 28 July 2008 - 12:00 PM

Hello Flying frog

Welcome to the forum and may I be just a little premature and say, welcome to the Darkside :big_starwars:

Also what UK Revolution Dealer is the best to go to and finally, are there any places I could possibly find a pre-owned Revolution Kite as a starter model?

For a good dealer look no further than my signature at the bottom of this post. They are almost unquestionably the largest Rev supplier in the UK. I have bought all my new Revs from them they are a great bunch of (guys and galls).

The only thing I would say is don’t just or order on line and hope, give them a ring first even if only to check availability the Rev range is extensive with 36 variations on the 1.5 alone (37 if you count the 20th anniversary edition) and no kite dealer can reasonably be expected to be able to keep all in stock. As for buying pre-owned, I have a few pre-owned bargains in my bag but I wouldn’t recommend one as a starter kite unless ( a ) you know and trust it’s history and ( b ) you have regular face to face contact with experienced Rev fliers to help sort out any potential problems, us Rev fliers are serious modders and tinkerers and you don’t want to be trying to learn to fly on somebody else’s mistakes. Talking of which, you don’t say where in the UK you are based but chances are you are not more than a couple of hours drive from at least someone on this forum. There are quit a few of us clustered around Dunstable in Bedfordshire and no doubt other groups will speak up, you would be well advised to try and meet up with other like minded folks. I have been flying Revs for about 3 years now and progress would have been a lot slower without the help and support of mates.

Sorry this is a bit long winded but I love my kiting and don't want to buy the wrong one or one that isn't suitable for me.

You ain’t seen all my reply yet, goes on a bit and may now have been superseded as others have posted while I have been composing this, but hopefully it will help to put you in the right direction.

You are absolutely right about choosing the right first kite. One thing you will need to get your head around quite quickly is the idea that, if you have two Revs, you don’t have two kites, you actually have two sails and two frames. Unlike a duel-line kite you can change a Rev frame in the field in minutes and end up with a totally different kite. It is very much a case of mix and match. I don’t expect you to get your head around it now, but a very popular configuration is a vented (high wind) sail with low wind spars. Yes I know it sounds daft but in the right conditions it’s sweeeet

You should set about building a good Rev bag in the same way as a novice golfer sets about assembling his golf bag with each new addition complementing those you already own. If you are serious about this your aim should be to collect a sail and set of sticks to cover all conditions.

Revolution kites fall into 2 groups the Speed Series which for our purposes I guess we can ignore, (if you are selling power kites and buggies for a safer existence) and the Precision kites which I guess interest you.

The precision kites come in three sizes. I, 1.5 & II usually expressed in Roman numerals. Incidentally 1 is the larger, down to II the smaller. I think it’s fair to say that most people here would recommend starting with 1.5s.

There are 3 routes into flying 1.5s.
1st the EXP the cheaper route, one kite fine for the occasional hour or two on a Sunday afternoon but if you want to take it seriously you’ll soon outgrow an EXP

2nd The SLE the most expensive route (the route I took). You start with a 1.5sle then, add (when funding permits) a 1.5sle vented for stronger winds and a 1.5sul for calmer conditions. One drawback with the SLE (Super Leading Edge) is that the std and vented kites come with a thicker heavier leading edge which though great for newbies, as they are near on indestructible, they have now somewhat fallen out of favour with experienced flies and at some point you will find yourself buying the thinner L/E spars. Having said that, when it’s really howling I wouldn’t be without my SLEs.

The 3rd route is the B series. This option was not available when I bought my first Rev. You will read a lot about how the sail panel layout channels the wind generating more drive, some swear by it while others are less convinced. Either way the real value of the B series is that each kite comes with 2 interchangeable frames, a Standard with a std and a super ultra light frame (labeled “Pro Use”) and the vented comes with std and a stiffer (Rev Equipped) frame.

There was a slight down side wit the B series in that it didn’t offer an sul sail I understand this was not thought necessary owing to the extra drive generated by the sail layout but I believe a B Series sul sail is now available as a special order.

Hope that helps, I know it’s a lot to take in. There are other considerations but for now they will only complicate matters.

Good luck with whatever choice you make.
Stone in Shoe Bob

It's Good to Share the Joy.

#6 Choccy

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Posted 28 July 2008 - 12:24 PM

hi, welcome

Kite Shop store also sell the B-series, or the 1.5 SLE. etc
Linked with its sister company in USA means they have good access to the stock (most of the time) and will ship in specifically if you request it ;)
It's always best to email or phone first.

have fun
1 of the 47.

#7 FlyingFrog

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Posted 29 July 2008 - 01:02 PM

Well guys, thanks for the advice, this is exactly what I was asking for. Please just help me to clear up a few points.
From what I can see (if I am reading the various pieces of advice given) my best bet as an experienced 4 line (Power) Kite flier is to get the 1.5 SLE, this being a mid range priced kite. If I do that is it possible at a later date when I have got used to it to use a different sail on it and can I change the "leading edge bar" for a heavier or a lighter one to help me cope with different wind and flying conditions?
I don't know if it helps but I am of medium build, 5 foor 7 inches tall and I tend to fly mainly on inland sites where the wind can be a little "gusty". My main interest is in learning as many of the different stunts possible with a Revolution kite.
Thanks, I really do appreciate your time and advice.
Just as a foot note, I live in Lancashire (Between Rochdale and Burnley) and have transport, so if there are any Revolution owners and fliers in my area I would be happy to meet up with them for further help and advice.

#8 Watty

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Posted 29 July 2008 - 01:14 PM

The SLE is a thick thick rod. The only upside to it, in my opinion, is that is is very difficult to break it. I would recommend, if possible, to get the SLE exchanged for a 1/4" 4 wrap LE. This rod is still very durable, and has better flying characteristics than the SLE.
Then, of course, you could later buy a 3 wrap or race rod set for your kite to help it fly in lighter wind.

Spence "Watty" Watson

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#9 wufer

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Posted 29 July 2008 - 01:44 PM

Flying Frog.
Welcome
I see you live in enemy territory (Lancashire) :P
Wait till big bri sees your post, he,s from your way
He,ll sort things out for you ;)

Derek.

#10 Ant-

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Posted 29 July 2008 - 02:14 PM

Hi there flying frog - fancy seeing you here ;)

Ant

#11 Baloo

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Posted 29 July 2008 - 09:57 PM

Well guys, thanks for the advice, this is exactly what I was asking for. Please just help me to clear up a few points.
From what I can see (if I am reading the various pieces of advice given) my best bet as an experienced 4 line (Power) Kite flier is to get the 1.5 SLE, this being a mid range priced kite. If I do that is it possible at a later date when I have got used to it to use a different sail on it and can I change the "leading edge bar" for a heavier or a lighter one to help me cope with different wind and flying conditions?
I don't know if it helps but I am of medium build, 5 foor 7 inches tall and I tend to fly mainly on inland sites where the wind can be a little "gusty". My main interest is in learning as many of the different stunts possible with a Revolution kite.
Thanks, I really do appreciate your time and advice.
Just as a foot note, I live in Lancashire (Between Rochdale and Burnley) and have transport, so if there are any Revolution owners and fliers in my area I would be happy to meet up with them for further help and advice.

Dont quite see where you are picking up that the recomendation is for a SLE, however if that is the way you want to go that is fine.

Once you get a SLE you might find it is just the kite for you. As Watty says the Leading Edge is almost indestructable. However it is the heaviest LE as well. Makes the kite rather stiff. Not easy to fly in lighter winds.

I would presume you are used to flying soft foils mainly. If the wind is high you go smaller, low you go bigger. If it is gusty you play safe and go smaller. Depending on your choasen form of "traqnsport" of course.

As Bob said, when he / we / a lot of us started, the B series had not been "invented" now that it is, and if I knew what I know today, and if I was just starting up I would go for a standard B as my first kite. It comes with a 2 wrap for those light wind days, a 3 wrap for thos breezy days, you can fit BOTH leading edges if the wind picks up. I would also buy a 4 wrap frame. I have flown in silly winds with a 3 and 4 wrap in there.

In reality I would bite the bullet and buy BOTH a Standard and Vented. You then get 2 more frame sets. With a 4 and 3 wrap in I have flown my vented in 50mph + winds.

I bought an EXP first, then a couple of Rev 2's, Supersonic, anther 2 so I could stack them, a Rev 1, BOTH the B's, 2 Sedgewicks, another Rev 1, a 20th, the list go's on.

Whixch one do I fly the most, the B Vented. I also line inland with swirly gusty winds.

At the end of the day your personal choice counts. Remember although the B is more expensive you do get 2 frames instead of one, neat handles with adjustable pigtails, and a SUPERcool DVD yo help you get started.

Whichever Rev you get you will enjoy it. When I got my first one it was too quick for me to understand the handle, I bought a 2mtr Sting which was slower and let me know how to control it. With your 4 line experience you will pick it up REAL quick.

Best of luck, be sure to let us all know how you get one. Hopefully you can put some of the money from your foil sales towards a Revolution Revolution.

#12 FlyingFrog

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Posted 29 July 2008 - 11:41 PM

Well guys, this is where I show how thick I can be! When I mentioned the 1.5 SLE I had interpreted it as being a member of the "B" series, obviously I was wrong! This is not very well explained on the "Kiteworld" web site so please can someone explain which models fall in with the "B" series family as I do not want to go and but a new Revolution only to find that it is not the best model of Revolution kite to suit my needs and requirements.
I value your advice and thank you for your time and help.

#13 Guest_groz_*

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Posted 30 July 2008 - 03:34 AM

Well guys, this is where I show how thick I can be! When I mentioned the 1.5 SLE I had interpreted it as being a member of the "B" series, obviously I was wrong! This is not very well explained on the "Kiteworld" web site so please can someone explain which models fall in with the "B" series family as I do not want to go and but a new Revolution only to find that it is not the best model of Revolution kite to suit my needs and requirements.
I value your advice and thank you for your time and help.



Ah, yes, we lovingly call the John Barresi series the 'B' series.

I started off learning on an SLE (funny story - we asked a certain Mr. Hoath what would be best to learn on, and he suggested the SLE. When he first caught us flying it, he said something along the lines of "which [idiot] suggested you learn on this one?" LOL ROTFC) - however the SLE is VERY strong, and many a crash landing while learning resulted in no damage to the frame. SLE's I find to be a lot more twitchy and harder to do precision flying.

We later got the 'B' - first off a vented then the standard. Because of the interchangable frames, these kites have a really good wind range. They are also very nice to fly.

Putting the 2,3 and 4 wrap frames in the SLE however does have nice results too.

The simple answer from me - buy them all, one of each type. No, I correct myself, buy 2 of each type, or maybe 3, then you have spares too :D :D :D

have fun!

#14 Stone in Shoe Bob

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Posted 30 July 2008 - 06:10 AM

From what I can see (if I am reading the various pieces of advice given) my best bet as an experienced 4 line (Power) Kite flier is to get the 1.5 SLE, this being a mid range priced kite

When responding to questions such as the one you opened this thread with I tend to avoid making specific recommendations, I prefer set out the pros and cons of various options so as to allow the questioner to reach their own informed decision.

Having read your post quoted above and re read my earlier comments, I realised I owe you and JB an apology. My post above is an edited down amalgamation of other posts emails and PMs I have written for other people and in all the cutting and pasting I think I may have been a little over zealous with the “Delete” key. As there is one advantage to the B series that is pretty well central to the “B Series” philosophy that I did not mention.

With a B series kite fresh out of the packet you have one sail and two frames. I had already said about changing the frame and getting a different kite.
Option 1 – sail with lighter frame one kite.
Option 2 – sail with heavier frame second kite.
But there is a 3rd option, because the leading edges are a thinner (diameter, not wall thickness) you can use both leading edges. This will give you something similar to the sle and would probably offer you the frame strength to get you safely through the early day crashes.

I have said that online I tend to avoid making specific recommendations, in face to face conversations where the pros and cons can be more easily discussed, if pushed, I generally end up recommending the B series route as it tends to be better VFM. One standard and one vented and you have pretty much covered all the bases, though some people (and I do include my self in this) think it leaves you a little exposed in lower wind but that may be not so much of a problem if the B series sul sail is available,

Conclusion.

I have reached the point now where generally I am very happy with the size and contents of my kite bag, if I lost it tomorrow and had to put in an insurance claim I would be looking to replace like for like. If however I was having to replace it myself then I would probably end up going the B series route.
Stone in Shoe Bob

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#15 Jeepster

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Posted 30 July 2008 - 06:30 AM

The simple answer from me - buy them all, one of each type. No, I correct myself, buy 2 of each type, or maybe 3, then you have spares too :D :D :D

have fun!


This is so sad to watch ... kind of like dope dealers hooking an innocent individual.

FlyingFrog, I noticed that you said you were selling your power kites ... as in plural ... as in more than one. You are already addicted ... it's simply a matter of which form your addiction will assume. As a newbie, I had the opportunity to step back from the abyss ... unfortunately I didn't. So, let me relate my short travel of a few weeks and see if it helps you.

Like you I wanted a good quality kite that I could stay with for a long time. I researched the average wind speed in this area (8~12 mph) and matched that wind speed up with a non-vented B-series (2- and 3- wrap frame sets) with all the accessories. I bought 80 foot LPG lines ... although the Shanti religious sect is probably right; their lines are okay too. Bought a traditional nerdy golf ball stake too. With that I went flying(?). If the non-SLE leading edge spars can survive my initial battle with gravity, they should be okay for you with your power kite experience.

But, the winds didn't pay attention to the weather station data. They played three pigs and the wolf with my kite ... I kept having to get up with the sun to fly before the winds assumed gale force. After having to borrow a vented kite from a fellow flyer to participate in a club fun fly, I ordered a vented B-series kite. The vented kite was ordered without the handles, DVD, weights and instructions ... just the sail, 3- and 4- wrap frame set, bridle, and sleeve. That makes it about $50 cheaper ... with today's conversion rate that's probably 2 or 3 pounds in English coin.

Oh, and I made a 90 pound 120 foot line set ... once again LPG. The 80 foot and 120 foot lines yield two different worlds of flying. The 120 foot set is needed to fly with others.

Confident that I had everything needed to go kite flying, I soon found the wind playing tricks once again. At the last club fun fly, everyone had their SUL kite out and I was flying my non-vented, 2-wrap frame set with the 80 foot #90 line-set and it felt like it was made out of lead. So, I'm now deciding on a color combination for an SUL kite. Again it'll be without accessories ... after all, one DVD of John B. is enough.

So, don't stew too much on what to buy first ... it won't cover all the wind speed ranges you'll encounter ... that was true in power kiting, yes? It's a vicious circle, so start mid-wind range and work your way around like I seem to be doing. Oh, and don't let Bri infect you with his: "that's purty ... gotta buy" approach. That's a completely different ball game.

The one thing I'm missing is having an experienced Rev flyer in the neighborhood ... learning to fly on your own is sometimes frustrating. Don't pay any attention to the strange ticks and stuff that Rev flyers have ... they're all strange ... sooner or later that is.

Cheers and welcome,
Tom

#16 Sailor99

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Posted 30 July 2008 - 08:26 AM

jeepster. With the winds you describe it sounds like you need a semi-vented. When will you be buying one? :devil:
Over - Jeremy

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#17 FortFlyer

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Posted 30 July 2008 - 09:20 AM

Confident that I had everything needed to go kite flying, I soon found the wind playing tricks once again. At the last club fun fly, everyone had their SUL kite out and I was flying my non-vented, 2-wrap frame set with the 80 foot #90 line-set and it felt like it was made out of lead. So, I'm now deciding on a color combination for an SUL kite.


I don't think it was the kite, I think it may be more toward the lack of experience in low wind.

My B-series fly's better in low wind then my SUL in fact I don't really care for it in winds over 5 mph I'll switch over to a vented with 2 wraps or race rods.

Before you get a SUL try a set of race rods in your B-series for ultralight conditions if you know someone that has them you may be quite surprised.
Jim,
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#18 Stone in Shoe Bob

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Posted 30 July 2008 - 09:20 AM

Well said Tom

You are so right Revs are like beer, one is never enough, but you have to start somewhere. I know when I bought my first Rev I was horrified at the price and I was determined I was only going to have one. I was very fortunate I was being advised by a mate at work who just happened to be a UK champion. It was pre B Series so there weren’t so many choices to make but it still took me a good couple of weeks to make a colour choice and commit. Now three years down the line I have a Rev bag worth, I guess, almost as much as a top notch golf bag and I have to say, it doesn’t owe me a penny. I don’t have any expensive club memberships or green fees to pay and I certainly don’t have to conform to any fancy dress codes.

I planned my collection with matching 1.5s and additional Revs are all in the same colour scheme. I thought it looked smart and made a bit of a personal statement, but then maybe I am just a bit anally retentive.
Stone in Shoe Bob

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#19 FlyingFrog

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Posted 30 July 2008 - 12:28 PM

Thanks for all the help guys. Not only have you all been extremely helpful in your advice Big Bri actually phoned me up and helped and advised me even further. I have spoken to Steven at Kiteworld and I think that I am pretty well sorted out with my decision. I look forward to getting my new Revolution Kite and hopefully seeing some of you out flying some time.
Your valuable help and advice has been much appreciated. Thanks.

#20 big bri

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Posted 30 July 2008 - 12:34 PM

Thanks for all the help guys. Not only have you all been extremely helpful in your advice Big Bri actually phoned me up and helped and advised me even further. I have spoken to Steven at Kiteworld and I think that I am pretty well sorted out with my decision. I look forward to getting my new Revolution Kite and hopefully seeing some of you out flying some time.
Your valuable help and advice has been much appreciated. Thanks.



Good to talk with ya Pete,cu soon on the feild mate.

BRIAN...




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